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TV REPORTS - Optics
  

Inside The NIH - Movement Labs

WASHINGTON D.C (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Movement disorders affect up to 72 million Americans. Now, a one-of-a-kind lab is helping doctors learn more about how to treat these disorders. We’ll explain four new technologies are allowing some patients get the treatment they need.

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Inside The NIH - Movement Labs

World’s Smallest Microscope Focuses In On Cancer

CHICAGO (Ivanhoe Newswire) --New technology is giving surgeons the ability to not only detect cancer earlier, but also immediately treat it and it’s all done virtually through the world’s smallest microscope. We’ll take you inside the body for the story.

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World’s Smallest Microscope Focuses In On Cancer

Anybots Taking Over The Workplace!

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- More than 128,000,000 people jump in a car, truck or bus to commute to work every day in the U.S, but with rise in telecommuting, that number is starting to go down. Now, robots are replacing telephones to give people a presence in the workplace, without leaving home, and we have the details.

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Anybots Taking Over The Workplace!

Saving Sight After A Stroke

ROCHESTER, NY (Ivanhoe Newswire) --One in four people who survive a stroke is left with vision loss that can significantly impact their lives. Patients are often told to adjust to their newly limited sight, as there have been few options available for improving it. Now, new research shows the brain can indeed be re-trained to see again. We have the story.

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Saving Sight After A Stroke

X-raying Art - Finding Treasures

Wilmington, DE (Ivanhoe Newswire) --It happens in the movies, and in real life! In fact, experts say half of all limited edition prints in the art market are fakes! And the most copied artist: Pablo Picasso drawings, prints and oil paintings.

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X-raying Art - Finding Treasures

Lasers Defying Gravity

ROCHESTER, NY (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Plants and trees fight gravity by pulling large amounts of water from the ground up through their leaves to survive. Now, a powerful laser can transform metal to pull liquid uphill and that breakthrough has far-reaching potential.

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Lasers Defying Gravity

Pink Diamonds: The Search for The Perfect Gem

WASHINGTON, DC (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A rare 24-carat pink diamond set the record on the auction block, selling for a whooping 46 million dollars! What’s so special about it? Pink diamonds are among the rarest of all gems.

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Pink Diamonds: The Search for The Perfect Gem

Biggest and Best 3D IMAX

BALTIMORE, MD (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You can go to the movies, or you can go to an IMAX theatre and have a larger than life movie experience. Add 3D and its like nothing you have ever seen.

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Biggest and Best 3D IMAX

Smart Phones Save Eyes

BOSTON, MA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Smart phones have that name for a reason but what about a Smartphone that could eliminate the need for a visit to the doctors office?

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Smart Phones Save Eyes

Video Rifles? Saving Lives In The ER

AUGUSTA, GA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You’ve seen it countless times on TV medical shows. Doctors in the emergency room have to intubate a patient, so the patient can breathe. It’s a routine procedure, generally done in the ER or during surgery, but something blocking the throat, or even a patient’s unique anatomy can make it difficult to do it quickly and safely. Now an emergency physician has invented a device to make intubation easier, for all patients.

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Video Rifles? Saving Lives In The ER

Dinosaurs Turn Into Work Of Art

BOZEMAN, MT (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- For more than 180 million years dinosaurs ruled the earth. Gigantic predators like T-Rex are gone forever, but their bones, or fossils, are still around for scientists to dig up and study. Now, old fossil bones can become beautiful works of modern art.

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Dinosaurs Turn Into Work Of Art

Patching Up Wounded Puppies

CORVALLIS, OR (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If your family dog got hurt, how much are you willing to spend to fix Fido? Consider that Americans will spend 47 billion dollars on their pets this year, and the answer is obvious. Now, some new science is proving that surgery doesn’t have to be the first option.

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Patching Up Wounded Puppies

On-the-Spot Cancer Diagnosis

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Each year, over 12 million new cases of cancer are diagnosed. Patients having to wait on test results can have a scary, nerve-wracking experience. Now doctors can diagnose some illnesses on the spot.

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On-the-Spot Cancer Diagnosis

Predicting the Next Quake

CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A month after a quake hit Haiti, more aftershocks continue to rattle the country. The 7.0 hit so fast, so violently, there was little anyone could do. Understanding changes in the earth's surface is key. Now a new laser mapping technology is changing the way we see the world.

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Predicting the Next Quake

Laser Labels For Fruits And Veggies

PEACHTREE CITY, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- From spinach to tomatoes, contaminated produce has made headlines … and a lot of people sick. When this kind of problem is discovered, one of the challenges is finding the source of the contamination. Now the Food and Drug Administration is looking at new technology to help the produce industry track and trace the fruits and vegetables we eat, from the field to the produce aisle.

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Laser Labels For Fruits And Veggies

Future of Solar Living

WASHINGON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Each year crowds gather on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. for a look at that latest in innovative, high-tech, solar powered homes. But these houses are not for sale. What you see here could end up in your home in a few years.

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Future of Solar Living

Targeting Breast Cancer

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Next to skin cancer, breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the United States. Patients often face chemotherapy, surgery and radiation to beat the disease -- all with potential side effects. Now a new cancer targeting therapy with fewer ill effects and better accuracy.

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Targeting Breast Cancer

Inside a Mummy

PALO ALTO (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- CT scans are used every day in hospitals and doctors' offices to detect heart problems and lung, liver and pancreatic cancers. Now the technology is being used to uncover mysteries 2,000 years old.

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Inside a Mummy

Restoring Art in an Instant

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Art restoration, making an object appear as it did originally, can be painstaking and difficult. If not carefully done, the process can cause more damage to an object. There is a new way to restore art -- without even touching it.

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Restoring Art in an Instant

Catching Cataracts Early

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Cataracts cause blurring of the eye's lens, and if not caught early enough, can lead to blindness. Now there's a new simple, early detection device to save your sight.

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Catching Cataracts Early

Attacking Dangerous Heart Plaque

ROYAL OAK, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Nearly 1 million Americans will suffer a heart attack in 2009. About half of those people will die. The FDA has just cleared the way for a new scan that can see inside a blood vessel and find a major cause of many heart attacks.

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Attacking Dangerous Heart Plaque

Diagnosing Heartburn

BALTIMORE, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Pain and discomfort from heartburn or acid reflux is common -- but when symptoms become severe, it could mean a more serious problem. A new technology is changing the way gastrointestinal disorders are detected.

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Diagnosing Heartburn

Where in the World

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A picture may be worth a thousand words -- but years after it’s snapped, it may be tough to tell where in the world that photo was taken. To solve the problem, researchers have devised the first computer program that can analyze a single photo and fill in the blanks.

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Where in the World

Saving Eyes

NEW YORK CITY (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Whether it’s cancer or macular degeneration, many times patients must face the reality that they will go blind. Now, a new treatment is helping save their sight.

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Saving Eyes

Workout for the Eyes

HOUSTON, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- To the average person, 20-20 vision is just fine -- but for athletes to succeed, their vision must be much sharper. That’s why many are turning to sports vision therapy to stay on top of their game.

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Workout for the Eyes

Detecting Disease in Less than 60 Seconds

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We’ve all heard about the threat of a pandemic. Scientists say during a major disease outbreak, or even a bioterrorism attack, one of the biggest enemies could be time. Using traditional testing, it can take days -- even weeks -- to confirm a diagnosis and isolate those infected. Now, science may have found a way to speed up the clock.

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Detecting Disease in Less than 60 Seconds

Anti-Counterfeiting Money

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Counterfeiting money is big business for criminals --nearly $70 million of fake currency gets used daily, costing consumers millions. To crack down on this problem, new anti-forgery technologies are helping put counterfeiters out of business.

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Anti-Counterfeiting Money

Detecting Carbon Monoxide

BOCA RATON, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless, and tasteless toxic gas that kills or injures thousands of unsuspecting victims each year. Now, there's a quick, easy, painless way to detect carbon monoxide poisoning and it's already saving lives in hospitals across the country.

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Detecting Carbon Monoxide

Shedding Light on Colon Cancer

EVANSTON, Ill. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- When colon cancer symptoms appear, the cancer is often already at an advanced stage. To catch it early, regular screening is a must. Soon, screening for colon cancer may not only be a whole lot easier -- but could also detect it earlier than ever before.

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Shedding Light on Colon Cancer

Computer Animated Blondes Have More Fun

ITHACA, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Lots of movies use computer-aided graphics to make non-real characters look realistic. But making realistic hair is still a challenge for Hollywood. Computers easily help make fake characters look real. But, it turns out, making realistic blonde hair, is one of the hardest things to create in movies.

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Computer Animated Blondes Have More Fun?

What's Your Baby Thinking?

ST. LOUIS (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- When doctors want to find out what's going on inside a baby's brain it usually requires, noisy or dangerous equipment and babies sitting completely still. But, new technology is now giving researchers a fascinating look inside an infant’s brain in a much easier way.

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What's Your Baby Thinking?

New Booze Busting Device

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Save your breath, a new tool for testing suspected drunk drivers will have cops asking, ”Stick out your arm.”

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New Booze Busting Device

New Booze Busting Device

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Save your breath, a new tool for testing suspected drunk drivers will have cops asking, ”Stick out your arm.”

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New Booze Busting Device

Detecting Diabetes with Light

Elkridge, N.Y -- Recycling programs have been underway for years, but Americans still lag behind on recycling efforts. The biggest reason -- it's inconvenient.

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Detecting Diabetes with Light

Recycling Without Sorting

Elkridge, N.Y -- Recycling programs have been underway for years, but Americans still lag behind on recycling efforts. The biggest reason -- it's inconvenient.

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Recycling Without Sorting

High-Tech Patient Identification

Charlotte, N.C. -- A new scanner that analyzes the unique characteristics of the veins under your palm is being used to identify patients when they check-in for doctor visits. This new twist on information technology is helping reduce errors that can lead to potentially deadly medical mistakes.

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High-Tech Patient Identification

Pain-Free Mammogram

Boston, Mass. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- One out of seven women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Up until now, a mammogram has been the best hope for early detection. But mammograms can be uncomfortable and difficult to read. Now, new technology may change all that.

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Pain-Free Mammogram

Taking a Trip in 3-D

Seattle, Wash. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- As your digital pictures quickly add up, going through them can be overwhelming. But experimental software makes it easy to find just the picture you want … and gives you a 3-D view into photo collections.

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Taking a Trip in 3-D

Digital Dentist

WASHINGTON DC, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Patients are all smiles about a new, mess-free way to make teeth impressions. Now, there's new hope for dental patients enduring the unpleasant, messy process of making teeth molds.

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Digital Dentist

Saving Electricity, Saving $

TROY, N.Y., (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Lighting an office building can cost a lot of money, and sometimes those lights are left on even when natural sunlight is pouring through the windows. Now, an easy solution, called DaySwitch, makes the most of those sunny days at work and soon, at home.

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Saving Electricity, Saving $

Bringing Sunlight Inside

TROY, N.Y., (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) – Solar energy technology is advancing daily. Now, a new, high-tech system is working to efficiently harness the power of the sun and drastically reduce harmful carbon dioxide emissions.

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Bringing Sunlight Inside

Making Movies: How'd They do That?

ATHENS, Ohio (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- "Polar Express" and "The Lord of the Rings" -- two films that used a new type of animation to bring characters to life, and a fiber optic suit is what's making animation more life-like than ever before!

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Making Movies: How'd They do That?

Cleaning up CO2

ATHENS, Ohio (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Global warming's effects can be seen worldwide, and many experts believe it's only going to get worse! In fact, America is by far the largest contributor to global warming than any other country -- releasing a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide -- the primary cause of global warming. But now engineers have found a natural way to eliminate one of the worst contributors to our environment's decay.

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Cleaning up CO2

Will Your Cancer Spread?

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Ocular melanoma, or eye cancer, is a serious disease that affects about 2,000 Americans each year. Roughly half of patients will die from the cancer because their tumor spreads to other areas of the body. Now, a new test can tell patients if they're looking at life ... or death.

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Will Your Cancer Spread?

Better Macular Degeneration Diagnoses

NEW YORK (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- For many people, getting older comes with the dread of age-related health problems, and loss of vision is one of the most common ones. But a new, high-tech test is changing the way eye doctors diagnose their patients.

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Better Macular Degeneration Diagnoses

Better Body Images in 3-D

PROVO, Utah (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- MRI and CT body scans can show every organ, tissue and bone in one image. But picking out just one body part from scans isn't easy.

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Better Body Images in 3-D

Virtual Human Body

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- We all know what we look like on the outside, but what about inside our bodies? Virtual reality usually flies us through imaginary worlds. Now a new one flies through the real world of the human body.

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Virtual Human Body

HDTV for Colonoscopies

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A colonoscopy is the gold standard for detecting colon cancer. Now, adding an HDTV signal and color change to the procedure could make the screening process more accurate in detecting the disease.

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HDTV for Colonoscopies

Holographic Movie Storage

LONGMONT, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- The way we watch movies, television, listen to music, and store all kinds of data is changing. Soon it'll be possible to get everything you need or want saved on a disc no bigger than your thumb.

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Holographic Movie Storage

Diagnosing Alzheimer's Earlier

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Alzheimer's disease deprives millions of Americans of their memories. There is no cure, but catching the disease in its earliest stages could help patients lead longer, healthier lives. Now there's a new way to diagnose the disease earlier than ever.

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Diagnosing Alzheimer's Earlier

Faster Results for Breast Cancer

TUCSON, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Every three minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer but getting the diagnosis can be a long, drawn-out process. Now, a new test shortens the wait time for breast cancer diagnosis from weeks to hours.

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Faster Results for Breast Cancer

Lights of the Future

TROY, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Do you know what your home will look like in the future? The future is now here with new lights that almost never have to be changed.

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Lights of the Future
New Light Bulb

PHILADELPHIA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There are many things that go along with aging; poor eyesight is one of them. If you squint and strain your eyes to see small print, a new bulb may help you see things in a better light.

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New Light Bulb

Detecting Alzheimer's Early

BOSTON (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Since 1980 the number of Americans with Alzheimer's has nearly doubled to 4.5 million. The disease robs people of their memory, while early detection of Alzheimer's has eluded members of the medical field for years. Now a new eye test may help determine if you're at risk and may unlock that mystery.

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Detecting Alzeimer's Early
Fire Sensors

SAN DIEGO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Wildfires often begin unnoticed, spreading quickly, with devastating consequences. Homeowner Dorothy Roth is still in shock three years after a wildfire raged through her backcountry community in southern California. She lost everything.

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Fire Sensors

Fiber Optic Laser

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- New technology is clearing the way for easier, safer and less-expensive surgeries for some patients.

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Fiber Optic Laser

Shedding Light on Heart Plaque

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Plaque build-up in the heart is not a good thing. But not all plaque is created equal. The most dangerous type -- called vulnerable plaque -- can lead to a heart attack. With new technology in the works, doctors may soon be able to tell their patients just what kind of plaque they have and how high risk they really are.

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Shedding Light on Heart Plaque

Safety-Proofing Plastic

CLEVELAND (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Researchers are constantly looking for new ways to make the materials we use better. Now, they may have found one -- a plastic that changes color when it's about to be damaged.

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Safety-Proofing Plastic

Hi-Tech Captions

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Over 28 million Americans have some type of hearing loss, ranging from a partial loss to deafness. Sign-language interpreters and assistive-listening devices can help but they aren't available everywhere. Now a new discovery puts the solution in the person's own hands.

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Hi-Tech Captions

Scanning for Leg Clots

CHAROLOTTE, N.C. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Pulmonary embolisms kill 60,000 people every year. Often, the clots form in the legs, break free and travel to the lungs, where they can cause sudden death. CAT scans can identify these clots in the lungs. Now, doctors are using that same technology to get a leg up on their diagnosis.

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Scanning for Leg Clots
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