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Power Pen - Lighting Up The Room

CHAMPAIGN, IL (Ivanhoe Newswire) --The ink pen has been around since the early 1900’s, and it’s barely changed its purpose --to write--in over 100 years. That is until now. We’ll show you how a pen can be used to light up a room.

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Power Pen - Lighting Up The Room

Melanoma In 3-D: Photoacoustic Tomography

DURHAM N.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Melanoma – it’s the most common form of cancer in the U.S and it’s one of the deadliest skin cancers. Now, a new kind of imaging could detect melanoma earlier and provide a better roadmap for the surgeon who removes it.

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Melanoma In 3-D: Photoacoustic Tomography

World's First Electric Fish Choir

CHICAGO (Ivanhoe Newswire) –A unique fish from the Amazon that only comes out at night is dazzling audiences across the globe in a first of its kind fish chorus. Now, check out a rare glimpse of science and art coming together to make music.

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World's First Electric Fish Choir

Eyeball Camera - Zooming Into The Future

CHAMPAIGN, IL (Ivanhoe Newswire)--Cameras have come a long way since Kodak first introduced them in the early 1900’s. All that power now comes in pocketsize, but for the perfect close-up, you still need a big zoom lens. Now, there’s a new camera that is small and can zoom!

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Eyeball Camera - Zooming Into The Future

Nanoskin Saves Lives and Limbs

PROVIDENCE, RI (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Losing a limb can be devastating and in the United States there are approximately one-point-seven million people living that way. One of the biggest fears for those who use prosthetic devices is getting an infection. But researchers are working on a way to mimic the human skin to cut down on infections.

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Nanoskin Saves Lives and Limbs

Robot + Fish = Fishbots Exploring The Sea

EVANSTON, IL (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Just like flying birds gave inspiration for the design of the airplane -- a fish that only comes out at night in murky waters of the Amazon, has inspired the design of an underwater robot. We’re introducing you to the fishbot!

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Robot + Fish = Fishbots Exploring The Sea

People Power: Turning Body Heat Into Energy

STOCKHOLM (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Coal, oil, solar, electric, natural gas, propane, and hydro -- the list of energy sources spans from below the earth’s surface to millions of miles above it. Now there’s a new source of power that that could put to use the seven billion people who live here.

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People Power: Turning Body Heat Into Energy

PC Of The Future: 3D Printers

WASHINGTON (Ivanhoe Newswire)--What if you could make an entire meal for your family without ever turning on the stove or even buying food at the grocery store? Sound impossible? Maybe not. We’ll show you the future of home 3D printing.

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PC Of The Future: 3D Printers

New Improved Solar Power

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Americans use a lot of electricity to run their homes, but despite the cost, many have yet to embrace using solar power. But now scientists are working on a new way to harness the sun’s power. We’ll show you how.

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New Improved Solar Power

Giving Robots A Hand

WASHINGTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) –Elektro debuted in 1939 and was the world’s first humanoid robot. Now, there are 400 robots serving in the U.S military but not all robot technology is high tech computer codes and machinery. We’ll show you how some coffee beans and a balloon are helping to move robots to the next level.

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Giving Robots A Hand

College In A Virtual World: Learning In Second Life

HOUSTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Many scientists believe nanotechnology will revolutionize the way we diagnose and treat human diseases in the future. Now, one scientist is guiding his students though this ever-expanding field in a very non-traditional classroom.

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College In A Virtual World: Learning In Second Life

Super Scanner Sees All

NEW YORK (Ivanhoe Newswire) --A CT scan at a hospital can take great pictures of virtually any part of the body, but now there's a CT scanner that can take even better pictures of more than just the human body. We’ll tell you about a super scanner.

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Super Scanner Sees All

This Dog Is No Dummy!

NEW YORK (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Last year, Americans spent $10 billion on the health of their pets. Learning to diagnose and treat pets that can't talk and say where it hurts is hard. And while trial and error in the classroom is all part of learning, in a real life situation one false move can be fatal. We’ll tell you about a lifelike dog that helps students train for vet emergencies.

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This Dog Is No Dummy!

The Most Energy Efficient Building In America

DENVER (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Twenty-percent of the country’s energy is consumed in office building, and most of that is for lighting. Limiting how much energy an employee uses may sound a bit harsh but in a new federal building, built to be greener it’s working. It may be the most energy efficient building in the country.

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The Most Energy Efficient Building In America

Building Better Bridges

HOUSTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Generally built to last 50 years, the average bridge in the U.S is now 43, and many are in desperate need of repair. Researchers are trying to come up with ways to repair those bridges with newer, better materials, and they’re getting closer.

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Building Better Bridges

Liquid Antenna

RALEIGH, NC (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Forty-five and a half million people in the U.S now own smart phones, chances are there’s one in your pocket right now. With every new model that comes out, mobile devices add new features and new capabilities that let us do even more on the go. But, a new discovery could one day change phones and all kinds of electronics-- on the inside.

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Liquid Antenna

March Madness: Science Of Shooting

RALEIGH, NC (Ivanhoe Newswire) --It’s March madness! College basketball teams from around the U.S are giving it everything they’ve got, hoping for a shot at the big dance. But what’s the secret to scoring big when it’s all on the line? A team of researchers revealed the secrets that lie in science and engineering, that can help players make more shots.

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March Madness: Science Of Shooting

Soap-Free Suds

WEST LAFAYETTE, IN (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We all know oil and water don’t mix, and cleaning oil from most surfaces requires lots of soap and scrubbing. Now there's a scrub-free, soap-free way to rinse away greasy grime.

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Soap-Free Suds

Hollywood Comes to the OR

BALTIMORE, MD (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Minimally invasive surgery provides patients with less pain and a faster recovery, but doctors often have to work harder with more complex surgical instruments for longer hours, putting a surgeon’s health at risk. Now doctors are studying other doctors to help make surgery easier and safer.

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Hollywood Comes to the OR

Veggies in space!

TUCSON, AZ (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It’s a question people have asked for centuries, could there be there life on other planets? Future space exploration is likely to provide the answer, but in the meantime scientists are working to answer yet another important question. Once we get to other planets, what are we going to eat?

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Veggies in space!

Robots Reading Autistic Kids' Minds

NASHVILLE, TN (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every twenty minutes, a child in the U.S. is diagnosed with autism. But despite the surge in cases, there’s been no way to ID what’s really taking place inside the autistic mind, until now. Instead of charts and books, experts are using nuts and bolts to push autistic kids to the next level.

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Robots Reading Autistic Kids' Minds

Predicting Aortic Aneurysms

PITTSBURGH, PA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- 15 thousand Americans die every year from aortic aneurysms, a sudden rupture in the wall of the body’s largest artery. Scientists are developing a tool to help doctors better predict which patients need immediate surgery and which patients are not at risk.

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Predicting Aortic Aneurysms

Saving Distracted Drivers

SALT LAKE CITY, UT (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The numbers are out. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, last year half of all car accidents involved distracted drivers. Nearly six thousand people died as a result of distracted driving, another half a million were hurt. Whether it’s using your cell phone or your GPS, there’s a new way to get from here to there without having to take your eyes off the road.

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Saving Distracted Drivers

KidGrid: Making the Grade

MADISON, WI (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- From kindergarten through high school, teaching is tough and demanding work. Daily quizzes, grading papers and progress reports are all part of the job. Now, a new high tech tool is getting high marks from teachers.

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KidGrid: Making the Grade

Cyber Smart Kids

PITTSBURGH, PA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- With countless Internet threats in cyberspace, it’s hard enough for adults to avoid dangers online and possibly, even harder for tech-savvy, yet curious kids. Now computer scientists have designed a game that teaches kids cyber security in a language that they can understand.

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Cyber Smart Kids

Rev Up Your Electric Engines!

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Rev up your engines! Wait electric cars don’t rev. We’ll tell you why this is dangerous, and what two Stanford grads are doing to improve safety on the roads. These gas saving cars have one grave downfall, they don’t let pedestrians and bikers know they are coming.

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Rev Up Your Electric Engines!

Inside A Lamborghini Lab

SEATTLE, WA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Good-old American steel used to be the gold standard in automobile production. While most cars still owe more than half their body weight to steel, times and materials are changing.

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Inside A Lamborghini Lab

Allergy-Free and Asthma-Free Green Home

YAKIMA, WA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- How important should a green home be to you? Americans spend 90% of their time indoors, with 65% of that time at home. The standard for green homes is now where sustainability and functionality are the same.

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Allergy-Free and Asthma-Free Green Home

Robots in the Classroom

FAIRFAX, VA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- While computers have taken over the classroom, kids still spend most of their day putting pen to paper. Despite that, 10 million children in the U.S qualify for therapy due to illegible handwriting. Now, a video game and a dash of robotic know how may be moving penmanship to the top of the class.

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Robots in the Classroom

Warning: Power Tool Hurt Hands

ATLANTA, GA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- You might think cutting off your finger is the biggest risk of mixing power tools and do it yourself projects, but there’s another danger lurking in the workshop.

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Warning: Power Tool Hurt Hands

The Key To Saving Cyclists

BOZEMAN, MT (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every nine minutes a pedestrian or cyclist is injured or killed on the road hit by a passing motorist who either didn't see them or wasn't paying attention.

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The Key To Saving Cyclists

New Roofs Put Money In Your Pocket

OAK RIDGE, TN (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- a roof over your head, it's what everyone wants. But for the money-conscious and green-minded, that means the latest, most energy efficient roof.

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New Roofs Put Money In Your Pocket

Animated Tutors: Making The Grade

SANTA CRUZ, CA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It's back to school and back to the books, but this isn't the classroom that you remember. Students and even teachers are going hi-tech to make the grade.

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Animated Tutors: Making The Grade

Green Wheel for Eco-Cyclists

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Now-a-days going green is where it's at, but when it comes to transportation, many are not able to give up their cars. Now a green wheel could have you peddling to work, not only gas free, but sweat-free.

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Green Wheel for Eco-Cyclists

Escaping a Submarine

NEW LONDON, Conn. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Escaping from a Navy jet is easy -- just pull the eject lever. But when you're in a submarine, more than 800 feet below the ocean's surface in frigid water, it makes escaping a lot more difficult. Now the Navy has a new way to train submariners how to escape, when they have no other way out.

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Escaping a Submarine

Breakthrough for Blindness

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You may have it and not even know it. Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetic eye disease that affects 100,000 people across the country. It mostly affects people in their 20s and 30s. In fact, this disease leaves its victims practically blind. Now, doctors are using bionic eyes to help people see again.

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Breakthrough for Blindness

Fighting Fire with Pyrohands

RALEIGH, NC. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Studies show for every one person injured in a household fire, two fire fighters go home hurt as well, and more than a quarter of those injuries are blamed on problems with their protective gear. Now engineers are using a new toy to keep crews safer when tackling towering flames.

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Fighting Fire With Pyrohands

Active Hand Rest: Stabilizing a Surgeon's Hand

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Right now, it's made of aluminum, plywood, geared motors, and a piece of foam rubber. But a University of Utah professor and his students are convinced that their invention will steady the hands of surgeons, artists, and people with conditions like cerebral palsy.

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Active Hand Rest: Stabilizing a Surgeon's Hand

Braille Labeler

PALO ALTO, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Imagine a world living in darkness -- no colors, no shapes, just black. That's reality for more than a million blind people in the United States. Now, a school project could make their lives a whole lot easier. It's one of those, "Wow. Why didn't I think of that?" ideas.

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Braille Labeler

Operating In 3-D

CHICAGO, Ill. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- They struggle to eat, speak and sleep. The more than 10 million people with jaw alignment problems are reminded of their pain with every bite. Braces and retainers help, but for serious cases, surgery is the best option.

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Operating In 3-D

Detecting Bombs, Saving Lives

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- As witnessed in the Oscar-winning film, The Hurt Locker, they can be hidden anywhere and made out of just about anything. Improvised explosive devices, or IEDs are hard to find, but a student competition found a new way to detect danger before it's too late.

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Detecting Bombs, Saving Lives

Creating Science Masterpieces

As engineering students at Georgia Tech were trying to develop a new material to clean emissions from engines, they also discovered something beautiful: works of art.

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Creating Science Masterpieces

Save Money: Cut Energy Costs

TOWSON, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- With this year's record setting winter and hot summer nights just right around the corner, home energy bills can take a big bite out of monthly budgets. But your home could be leaking energy, and money, right out the window. Now a new laser thermometer uses infrared technology to help you to spot energy leaks and lower your energy bill.

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Save Money: Cut Energy Costs

Soldier Safety: Sniper-Detecting Helmet

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Almost 5,000 soldiers have died in Iraq and Afghanistan, and another 30,000 have been injured. A new combat helmet could give soldiers an edge in the war zone, and help them return home safely.

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Soldier Safety: Sniper-Detecting Helmet

Replacing Eyes, Nose, Ears and Fingers

DALLAS (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Art is mixing with medicine to help people regain the appearance of a normal life.

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Replacing Eyes, Nose, Ears and Fingers

Car Parts Made Out Of Coconuts?

WACO, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There are 125 million cars are on the road today. That's billions of pounds of steel and glass on our roadways. But now, some parts of your car could be created by fruit.

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Car Parts Made Out Of Coconuts?

Pill Picker, Med Sorter, Life Saver!

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Medication errors cause at least 7,000 deaths in the United States each year. It's a problem that health care systems work hard to prevent. Now a new technology is helping prevent mediation mistakes.

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Pill Picker, Med Sorter, Life Saver!

'Intelligent' Tools Help Disabled

BARCELONA, Spain (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- 1.8 million people rely on walkers to get around, and 1.7 million people use a wheelchair. While mobility devices improve independence, navigating some spaces is still difficult. Now researchers are developing new intelligent tools that cater to the disabled.

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'Intelligent' Tools Help Disabled

Protect Your Computer, Protect Your Identity

HUNT VALLEY, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you work in an office, a cubicle, a coffee shop, or in an airport, privacy and your computer is a big deal, especially when working with confidential documents. Now there's a new way to protect your PC's privacy.

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Protect Your Computer, Protect Your Identity

Xbox Crime Fighting

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Computer crime has been a growing problem since it first showed up on the scene in the 1980s. While criminals keep coming up with new ways to break the rules, now law enforcement is better at cracking these crimes thanks to a new way to reveal evidence hidden by criminals.

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Xbox Crime Fighting

Science Meets Art

URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, Ill. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Take a look at the world of science through the eyes of what scientists see everyday. You'll see some surprising things in the art of science.

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Science Meets Art

Smarter, Safer Cars

GRANADA, Spain (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There are more than six million car accidents every year, and researchers say more than 40 percent of them happen at night. Engineers are trying to change those numbers by building cars that adapt to your driving habits, and warn you when there's trouble ahead.

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Smarter, Safer Cars

Tracking Down Tax Evaders

COLUMBIA, S.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Americans owe $345 billion in unpaid taxes. Punishment could be years in jail or hefty penalties, but many times tax evaders are only caught if they're reported or if they fall victim to an IRS audit. Now, new police technology is making it harder than ever for tax evaders to hide from the law.

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Tracking Down Tax Evaders

Key 2 Safe Driving

SOUTH JORDAN, Utah (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You've probably done it or been tempted to do it -- text and drive or talk on the phone and drive. That type of distracted driving causes half a million accidents and kills more than 2,600 people in this country every year. But soon, a $50 device will make it just about impossible to text and drive.

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Key 2 Safe Driving

Vacation in Space

BARCELONA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Just as winter starts to set in, we're looking forward to vacation. Where's your favorite spot? A beach? A big city? Maybe a cruise? Now there's a new option that's out of this world!

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Vacation in Space

Building "Super" Hands

HOUSTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- From hand injuries to carpal tunnel syndrome, every year millions of Americans suffer problems that limit their ability to use their hands. Evaluating these problems can be key to choosing the most effective treatment. Now, science has come up with a simple diagnostic tool that could make a dramatic difference for these patients.

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Building 'Super' Hands

Virtual Nurse: Always On Call

BOSTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Most people can't wait to get released from the hospital. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the latest statistics say nearly 40 million patients, excluding infants, are discharged each year. But often patients go home not fully understanding their follow up care. Now, new computer technology could virtually clear up all the confusion.

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Virtual Nurse: Always On Call

Tracking Buses, Saving Time

SEATTLE, Wash. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Public transportation saves 855 million gallons of gas each year. If you want to go green, but you don’t want to wait forever for the next bus, there's a new, free service that gets rid of the bus stop guesswork.

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Tracking Buses, Saving Time

The Next Generation of Cars

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Scientists, car companies and the federal government are teaming up to reduce traffic congestion and dangerous driving conditions. In the not-too-distant future, cars will be able to communicate traffic information by talking to each other.

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The Next Generation of Cars

Smart Speed Bumps

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Speed bumps are made to slow drivers down … but a new, special speed bump does much more than reduce your speed.

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Smart Speed Bumps

World's First! Patrol Car with a Purpose

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every day, 425,000 law enforcement vehicles patrol the streets of the U.S. Unlike the cars and trucks used by fire departments, the military or even postal carriers, police cars aren't built specifically for the job they do. Now that's changing. Science and law enforcement have joined forces to create a whole new kind of car.

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World's First! Patrol Car with a Purpose

Robots Taking Over the Garden

HOPE, R.I. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Too much sun, too little water -- all parts of the equation that could keep plants from thriving. But now scientists have created robots to help man the fields.

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Robots Taking Over the Garden

Super Mileage Cars

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Cars on the road today are getting better gas mileage than ever, but the future looks even brighter. In one super-mileage car competition, cars from all over the world are breaking fuel economy records.

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Super Mileage Cars

Keeping Food Safe & Bacteria Free

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Eating food contaminated with bacteria can cause serious illness.

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Keeping Food Safe & Bacteria Free

Smart Bridge: Keeping Drivers Safe

MINNEAPOLIS (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- This month marks the two year anniversary of the Minneapolis bridge collapse, when 13 people died and more than 140 were hurt.

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Smart Bridge: Keeping Drivers Safe

Taking Students Off-Road Racing

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Engineering students from all over the world gather for a down and dirty off-road vehicle competition.

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Taking Students Off-Road Racing

Robo Dog To The Rescue

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- One in five Americans lives with disabilities, limitations that can make everyday tasks difficult or even impossible. Getting an assistance dog can take months or even years on a waiting list, but thanks to biomedical researchers, there could soon be a high-tech alternative.

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Robo Dog To The Rescue

Predicting Breakdowns

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- No one knows what caused the Air France flight to come down last month, killing everyone onboard, but what if you could predict when there was going to be a mechanical problem or part failure? That's exactly what some scientists are hoping to do -- prevent breakdowns, by predicting exactly when they'll happen.

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Predicting Breakdowns

Space Workout

CLEVELAND (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Imagine living six months in outer space. That's what astronauts aboard the international space station are doing right now. But that's just the beginning. NASA is preparing to send men and women back to the moon. One mission could last a year, or even longer.

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Space Workout

Boat Safety from Outer Space

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Boating is one of the most popular summer pastimes in the United States. Seventy-five million people are sailing, power boating, fishing, or just exploring out on the water. More than 16 million boats are in use nationwide. Now, thanks to NASA meteorologists, there's new information that could help boaters stay safe out on the water, and even catch more fish.

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Boat Safety from Outer Space

Put Pep Back Into Your Pet's Step

KETCHUM, Idaho (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- For many dog owners, seeing your pet in pain is heartbreaking. As dogs age, they can develop joint pain in the elbows – causing a limp, or in severe cases, a walk in the park to become impossible. A new surgery can put the pep back into your pet's step.

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Put Pep Back Into Your Pet's Step

Comfy Car Seats

ANDERSON, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- After sitting in a car for long periods of time, your car seat can become your worst enemy, causing so much discomfort that you can't wait for the trip to end. A new kind of car seat is designed to put comfort back in your ride.

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Comfy Car Seats

Sports: Inside Your TV

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Golf balls fly far, NASCAR stock cars race around the track, and football action is fast -- so fast that you might miss something. That's why computer scientists are stepping up to the plate to help TV viewers see exactly what's going on. Here's a behind-the-scenes look at the sports you watch on TV.

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Sports: Inside Your TV

Longer Lasting Hips

MADISON, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- More than 150,000 people will have a hip replacement this year, but the implants typically only last between 15 and 20 years. Engineers have developed a new technique that could help patients find a better fit. The inspiration came from a masterpiece made of stone.

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Longer Lasting Hips

Rubberized Roads: Making Streets Quieter

PHOENIX (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We have 4 million miles of roads and streets in the U.S. highway network. With millions of cars and trucks travelling those roads every day, the federal government wants to find ways to reduce the noise impact on nearby neighborhoods. How? The answer might be right under your wheels.

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Rubberized Roads: Making Streets Quieter

Reducing Your Lead Footprint

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every day, Americans throw away more than 350,000 cell phones and 130,000 computers, making electronics the fastest-growing garbage producer. Many of the gadgets we use contain toxic lead and are polluting the environment when they reach landfills. Scientists have developed a safer material for those devices.

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Reducing Your Lead Footprint

Just in Time Disaster Training

CAMP DOUGLAS, Wisc. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- They train for the worst case scenario, but will rescuers know how to react when a real disaster hits? A new state-of-the-art training facility is making sure emergency crews get as close to the real thing as possible.

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Just in Time Disaster Training

From Forensics to Fashion: 3-D Body Shaping

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- From forensics to fashion, computer scientists are on the case. A new software program detects what's beneath clothing to create a 3-D body image that helps police ID criminals and may also one day help fashionistas figure out what look best.

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From Forensics to Fashion: 3-D Body Shaping

RoboClam to the Rescue

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Many people enjoy eating fried clams and chowder. Now, it appears those tasty sea creatures could eventually change the way the military, oil drillers and even sailors dig into the sea.

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RoboClam to the Rescue

Better Tasting Tap Water

BLACKSBURG, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Drinking tap water from your home is the easiest and cheapest way to quench a thirst, but some people don't find tap water very tasty. We'll tell you what could be to blame in your home for funny tasting tap water.

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Better Tasting Tap Water

Doppler Radar Tracking Babies

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It's the number one cause of death before age one. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) takes the lives of one in 2,000 babies. Now a new baby monitor may keep a watchful eye on little ones as they sleep.

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Doppler Radar Tracking Babies

Cars Powered by the Sun

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- From Texas to Calgary, people were asking, "What is it? Could it be something from space?" It's not a UFO. Instead of flying in the sky, it runs on the road. It's the next generation of solar-powered cars. Even in the dark, the car is powered by the sun and the ingenuity of students from the University of Michigan.

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Cars Powered by the Sun

Virtual Reality Surgery

AUGUSTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- How do you learn to do major surgery without actually doing surgery? By 2010, nationally accredited medical schools will be required to have hands-on programs to prepare students for increasingly complex procedures before they actually go into surgery. No patients are needed for these operations -- it's all virtual reality.

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Virtual Reality Surgery

Tracking Miners

AKRON, Ohio (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Coal miners provide the raw material for nearly half of America's power. Mining is a necessity, but it's a dangerous job. Every year, 40 people in the United States die trapped in a mine, and China alone reported almost 4,000 coal mining deaths in 2007. New technology is going underground to help keep track of miners and save lives.

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Tracking Miners

Mini Fetal Monitor Saves Lives

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Every mother-to-be wants to deliver a healthy baby, and doctors use large ultrasound monitors to check on the health of their unborn babies. A new cell-phone-sized device keeps watch on unborn babies around the clock.

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Mini Fetal Monitor Saves Lives

Digital Evidence

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A good fingerprint at a crime scene isn't always the smoking gun for solving crimes. Thanks to new technology, crime solving is going digital.

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Digital Evidence

Alternative to Open Heart Surgery

(Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Chances are you know someone who has had heart problems. In fact, one in five people over the age of 55 has a problem with their mitral valve. A new alternative to open heart surgery can get their blood flowing again.

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Alternative to Open Heart Surgery

Fixing Damaged Knees

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- More than 15 million Americans have osteoarthritis in their knees, and about 600,000 of them could be helped by a partial knee replacement. A new way to fix arthritic knees that uses robots and computers is helping patients walk out of the hospital the same day of surgery.

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Fixing Damaged Knees

Engineering Students Rock!

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Skills from mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science come together to form a cool kind of class that's a hit with students.

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Engineering Students Rock!

Evacuation Routes go Hi-Tech

TUCSON, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- In most American cities, gridlock is a fact of life -- but don’t blame it all on that daily commute. Sometimes, it’s the unexpected. Natural disasters and other emergencies can create huge traffic jams. In fact, hurricanes Katrina and Gustav both forced 2 million people out of their homes. Now, scientists and engineers may have a solution to evacuation chaos.

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Evacuation Routes go Hi-Tech

Moving in the ICU

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- An intensive care unit (ICU) is home to critically ill patients who often spend day and night in bed hooked up to life support machines and monitors -- but not anymore. Now, a new device is getting patients out of bed faster than ever.

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Moving in the ICU

Building The Perfect Butterfly House

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Inside a butterfly house, you can get an up close look at these delicate creatures. There are many challenges when it comes to designing a home just for butterflies.

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Building The Perfect Butterfly House

Saving Gas -- Saving $$

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- No one likes being stuck at a red light. Poor traffic light timing not only hurts your commute, it can hurt your wallet. Now, there is a way that small change in traffic lights can save you big in gas money.

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Saving Gas -- Saving $$

Why Can't Cars Move Like Crabs?

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you’ve ever gotten stuck in mud or sand in your car, you know that our cars, trucks and SUVs don’t always do what we need them to. But now there’s a smoother way for us to get around all the bumps, holes and curves that come our way.

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Why Can't Cars Move Like Crabs?

Better Bait

MADISON, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Fishing is one of America's most popular pastimes. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife service says more than 28-million people will go fresh-water fishing this year, spending billions on fishing lures, lines and poles. But there's a downside -- researchers say 12-thousand tons of those plastic lures end up in lakes and waterways every year. But now, polymer scientists and one savvy fisherman may have the solution.

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Better Bait

Edible Anti-freeze Saves Ice Cream

MADISON, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- People in the U.S. eat more ice cream than any other country in the world. The average American consumes about 24 quarts of ice cream a year. But, if you buy a lot of ice cream, you know that freezer burn or ice crystals can ruin the flavor and creaminess of your favorite treat.

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Edible Anti-freeze Saves Ice Cream

Lifesaving Water Rescue

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Each year, there are over 7,000 drowning deaths, many in rough, choppy waters of rivers and oceans. But rescue efforts in swift water are among the most difficult for emergency teams. Now, a new rescue device makes saving lives easier.

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Lifesaving Water Rescue

Sniffing Out Bombs

LA JOLLA, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- From terrorist bombings on the ground and in the air, t-a-t-p, a peroxide-based explosive has been used in many suicide bombings. There's no easy way to detect the chemical in the field. But now, that is about to change.

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Sniffing Out Bombs

Paint That Can Prevent Plane Crashes

ROANOKE, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Airplanes are visually inspected everyday, but tiny cracks and flaws on planes can be easily missed. Now, a new kind of paint could expose hidden damage on planes.

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Paint That Can Prevent Plane Crashes

The Future of Robots

BERLIN (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A world of robots may seem like something out of a movie, but it could be closer to reality than you think. Engineers have created robotic soccer players, bees and even a spider that will send chills up your spine just like the real thing.

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The Future of Robots

Preserving America's Birth Certificate

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A map thought lost for almost five centuries is found and is now on display. It's often called America's birth certificate.

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Preserving America's Birth Certificat

Scum-Free Fish Tank

BETHLEHEM, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Maintaining a saltwater aquarium can be an expensive hobby. Just setting up a 55 gallon tank can cost about $1500s -- and that's without fish! But a group of young engineers are using a rare earth magnet to build a better environment for ocean life and help precious species thrive in captivity.

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Scum-Free Fish Tank

Bad Weather: Bad Drivers

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Each year, nearly 7,400 people are killed and over 670,000 are injured in crashes. But not all wrecks are because of driver error. Ivanhoe reveals what really factors into many of these accidents.

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Bad Weather: Bad Drivers

Space-Age Technology At The Dentist

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Space-age technology, biomedical engineering and computer science -- they're all coming soon to your dentist's office near you. It's revolutionary science that could help give you a healthier smile.

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Space-Age Technology At The Dentist

Smart Pens

OAKLAND, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Blind students are about to speed up their learning curve thanks to a new "smart" pen. Did you know, just three characters of Braille take up an inch on a page? This new pen can condense that information into just one smart dot.

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Smart Pens

Tired Truckers

ASHBURN, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- it's estimated that driver fatigue causes 100,000 crashes each year. Truckers often work more than 50 hours a week and can legally drive for up to eleven hours non-stop. With extra-long hours on the highway, exhaustion is a big concern. Now, virtual reality is being used to help make roads safer.

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Tired Truckers

Crashes That Save Lives

ASHBURN, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Each year, more than three million people are injured in car accidents, and every 12 minutes, someone dies in a crash. With so many cars on the road, it's a trend that's likely to continue and get worse! But now, high-tech crashes helping save lives.

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Crashes That Save Lives

Safer Roads

ASHBURN, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- About six million car crashes happen every year, with many involving cars and trucks crashing into roadside barriers and signs. Now, Ivanhoe explains how state-of-the-art testing is making roadway obstacles safer.

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Safer Roads

Virtual Reality for Construction Zones

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Each year, over 350 construction workers die -- many from falls. Now, Ivanhoe explains how a virtual reality construction site may help save lives.

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Virtual Reality for Construction Zones

Nanotechnology: Cleaning up our Water

HOUSTON, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- He's just 37 years old, but he's already making a difference in the world! Now, Ivanhoe introduces a young engineer who's creating small solutions to big problems.

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Nanotechnology: Cleaning up our Water

New Hope for Stroke Survivors

HOUSTON, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There are more than four million stroke survivors living in the United States. It's been a standard prognosis for almost all of them -- whatever motor skills you didn't get back right away may be lost forever; but now, new technology is proving that even stroke rehab is better late than never.

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New Hope for Stroke Survivors

Moon Rover

PITTSBURG, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Imagine an environment where temperatures fall well below negative 200 degrees. There's powdery ground, deep craters and large boulders -- and the journey is made in perpetual darkness. Now, roboticists are developing a prototype rover for NASA that could withstand the moon's brutal conditions -- and still provide it's human counterparts with lifesaving resources.

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Moon Rover

How Safe is this Bridge?

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The sudden collapse of the I-35 Minneapolis bridge that killed 13 people in August, left questions about the safety of our nation's bridges. Now, there is a new device that offers a high-tech approach to inspecting bridges.

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How Safe is this Bridge?

Watch Where You Walk, Soldier!

NATICK, Mass. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We start out crawling, then graduate to walking. After that we don't think much about it. But a new device used in a study by the military could save soldiers' lives and help civilians keep their feet on the ground in new surroundings.

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Watch Where You Walk, Soldier!

Ditch Your Crutches!

LANGHORNE, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Maybe you've been there -- a sports injury, a car accident or a mishap at home. Next thing you know, your broken or fractured bones are wrapped in a cast for weeks. Now, a retired firefighter has invented a new type of cast that helps the injured ditch their crutches for short stints so they can get up and go.

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Ditch Your Crutches!

The Perfect Chair for Low Back Pain

HOLLAND, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Back pain sufferers may finally get some relief, especially during long work days. Now, there's a new office chair that compliments your desk and your body.

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The Perfect Chair for Low Back Pain

Cooling Suit

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Firefighters battle flames and smoke in gear that is specially designed to insulate them -- even when temperatures exceed one thousand degrees. But the very same life-saving equipment a firefighter dons may be putting him or her at risk -- by raising body temperatures to dangerous levels. Now researchers are developing a system to cool them off while they're smack dab in the middle of the fire.

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Cooling Suit

Vitals Vest

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Firefighting is a dangerous job, but the biggest risk doesn't come from the fire, smoke, or chemicals. Half of all firefighters who die in the line of duty suffer fatal heart attacks. Now, researchers are testing special gear that someday may alert others if a fellow firefighter is in trouble.

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Vitals Vest

Keeping Cool on the Ice

MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Ice hockey is a fast…. Intense…. Played in freezing temperatures.

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Keeping Cool on the Ice

World's Fastest Robot

GOETTINGEN, GERMANY (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Robots are the wave of the future. And nothing is moving there faster than the world's fastest robot -- one that could set the pace for all robots in the future!

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World's Fastest Robot

Planes Improve Weather Forecasts

HAMPTON, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Our sky is filled with all types of weather, it’s also filled with airplanes -- some facing rough weather head-on. Now, some weather forecasters are using these planes to make better weather predictions.

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Planes Improve Weather Forecasts

Strange Matter

PHOENIX, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Bizarre, wacky, gooey and fun! Something really strange may be coming to a city near you. When it does, it will answer all kinds of questions like, can a spider's silk be strong enough to stop a 747 jet in flight?

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Strange Matter?

Earthquake Proof House

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- People in California know all too well the aftermath of a powerful earthquake. Despite major improvements to building codes, and existing structures, there is still the threat of serious damage and possibly, loss of life. Engineers are working to design better buildings, able to withstand whatever Mother Nature has to offer.

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Earthquake Proof House

People-Free Parking

New York, N.Y. -- The latest in parking technology is here -- an automated parking garage. No one is behind the wheel, but a computer software program is responsible for parking cars. And, it's parking in the most efficient and environmentally friendly way possible.

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People-Free Parking

Stopping Sinkholes and Street Floods

Toronto -- We all watched the pipes burst underground in New York City. In fact, the National Research Council issued a report saying much of the nation's water distribution system will need to be replaced in the next 30 years. To replace all those pipes would cost billions of dollars. Instead of replacing them, what if you could just fix the problem spots? But locating those spots is the tricky part.

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People-Free Parking

Concrete Canoes

SEATTLE, Wash. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You think of concrete in our sidewalks, roads, and homes. But what about using it to make boats? When you're racing canoes made of concrete, it's not only about who's the fastest. How you build them is critical.

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Concrete Canoes

High-Tech Crime Fighting

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Fighting crime is a tough job in any city. But now, police have help to track crime, and spot high crime areas faster.

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High-Tech Crime Fighting<

Robots: The Next Generation

BOSTON, MA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The Jetsons' Rosie the robot is fantasy, but one m-i-t engineer is trying to make it reality with a robot named Domo.

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Robots: The Next Generation

Bus Of The Future

DETROIT (Ivanhoe Broadcast News, Inc.) -- Most of us gladly ride in cars, airplanes, even trains -- but buses? There's a bit of a stigma attached to them. Now, one engineer has a built a new type of city bus he hopes will make people want to ride.

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Bus Of The Future

Seeing Through Walls

VIENNA, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- X-ray vision is no longer just for sci-fi movies and superheroes. Now, superhuman powers are closer to real life than you might think. Engineers have developed a new device, called the Xaver that can see straight through walls.

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Seeing Through Walls

Light- Up Tents

A new breakthrough for your next camping trip -- a tent that lights up.

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Light- Up Tents

Movie Magic

SAN FRANCISCO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A character's movement can look very real in movies, but animators admit it is hard to make the faces look as expressive as human faces. Animators are now working hard on new technologies to make it almost impossible to tell the difference between cartoons and real-life. Ken Pearce, a computer scientist with Mova Contour, admits, "We recognized that facial animation is really one of the last big challenges of computer animation."

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Movie Magic

Diabetes Discovery

SANTA CLARA, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Diabetes affects over 20 million Americans. It can cause many serious health problems, including blindness. Treatment for eye problems is possible, but can be extremely painful. Now, thanks to chemical physics, there is a new laser technology, called PASCAL, can treat patients in just five minutes, and virtually pain-free.

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Diabetes Discovery

What Causes Motion Sickness?

MINNEAPOLIS (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There are plenty of treatments for motion sickness, but no one really knows what causes it. And why are some people affected, but not everybody? Human factors researchers at the University of Minnesota are conducting experiments to discover exactly what causes motion sickness.

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What Causes Motion Sickness?

Breakthrough In Brakes

Malta, N.Y., (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- City driving is a pain, and just to add more fuel to your fury, your car's cast iron brakes cost you money every time you drive.

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Breakthrough In Brakes

Home Makeover 101

BLACKSBURG, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Many homeowners want to bang it, saw it, and take on home improvement projects themselves. But homeowners doing speedy repairs or hurried remodel jobs on their own need to be aware of the dangers of weekend warrior projects.

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Home Makeover 101

Making Movies: How'd They do That?

ATHENS, Ohio (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- "Polar Express" and "The Lord of the Rings" -- two films that used a new type of animation to bring characters to life, and a fiber optic suit is what's making animation more life-like than ever before!

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Making Movies: How'd They do That?

Hurricane-Proof House

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- The Great Labor Day Storm of 1935: 423 people dead in Florida. Hurricane Camille devastates the Mississippi coast in 1969 Wind speeds top 200 mph. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 ... New Orleans is left under water.

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Hurricane-Proof House

Finding a Whatchamacallit on the Web

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Whether you need a bolt, a motor, a belt or a tool, finding the perfect, hard-to-describe part can be like finding a needle in a haystack. But now, engineers have put together a computer program that can track down just about anything you need -- even if you don't know what it's called!

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Finding a Whatchamacallit on the Web

Metal Rubber

BLACKSBURG, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Portable gadgets were meant to be taken on the move. Portable also means accidents and damage can happen. Now, imagine electronics that can take a beating and bounce back! It's soon possible with a shocking new flexible, indestructible material, called metal rubber.

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Metal Rubber

HurriQuake Nails

EAST GREENWICH, R.I. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Each year millions of dollars are lost to natural disasters. A hurricane tends to push and lift roofs off of homes, while an earthquake rocks a house back and forth.

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HurriQuake Nails

Paperless Books

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Newspapers can be cumbersome, books can take up space, and computer screens can be difficult to read. But now a unique technology may revolutionize the way we read.

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Paperless Books

Bug Breakthrough

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When you think of a beetle, you think creepy, crawly critters. Now add one more adjective to the list: Clever -- clever because despite living in the desert, the beetle is able to gather drinking water.

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Bug Breakthrough

Man-Made Diamonds

SARASOTA, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Diamonds. They're the symbol of love, romance and weddings. But you don't have to receive a little blue Tiffany & Co. box to get one. A small white box is the key to making a diamond. It's in machines in Sarasota, Fla., where real diamonds are grown ... by man.

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Man-Made Diamonds

Fly, Jet-Lag Free

SEATTLE, Wash. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Taking off on a long flight? Then you probably try things to fight jet lag. But preventing the effects of jet lag may soon be a matter of simply the plane you take off in. This new Boeing 787 Dreamliner is designed to make you feel more refreshed when you reach your destination.

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Fly, Jet-Lag Free

Safer Airport Runways

McLean, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Many frequent flyers are familiar with taxi and take-off waits on airport runways. The wait is frustrating for passengers, but pilots need to pay extra attention while near or on a runway.

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Safer Airport Runways

Step-by-Step CPR

WOBURN, Mass. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- During a medical emergency, seconds can mean the difference between life and death. Each year in the United States, 300,000 people suffer cardiac arrests, yet studies show only 1 percent of the public have proper CPR training.

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Step-by-Step CPR

Smart Cars

BERKELEY, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Five grand, 15 grand, 50 grand -- you get what you pay for in a car. But a sweet ride doesn't guarantee a safe ride.

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Smart Cars

Smart Meters Save $

SAN FRANCISCO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- During the winter, we crank up the heat. During the summer, we turn up the air. And all the time we're eating up electricity. Now a new smart meter may help to save energy and save money.

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Smart Meters Save $

Turn on Sunlight Inside

OAK RIDGE, There's nothing like a little sunshine to lift our spirits, but most of us spend our days indoors, working under the glow of those fluorescent lights that contribute to sky-high electric bills.

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Turn on Sunlight Inside

Board Games of the Future!

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Scrabble, Monopoly, Clue ... They are the games of life, but your mom and dad's board game is moving into the 21st century.

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Board Games of the Future!

Smart Trash Cans

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Buying recycled products is all the rage, but do you recycle? The average person uses 650 pounds of paper each year. Americans go through 2.5 million plastic bottles every hour! Those bottles and other recyclables are filling up our landfills. Now a new garbage bin can actually save the environment and make you some money.

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Smart Trash Cans

Turning Trash Into Power

DAVIS, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There's a new twist on the old adage, one man's trash is another man's treasure. Now that trash may be another man's power. Researchers in California are turning garbage into bio-gas that my one day provide the electricity in your home.

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Turning Trash Into Power

Slowing Down Speeders

RICHMOND, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A site along a Lee Chapel Road in Fairfax County, Virginia, is in memory of 18-year-old, Jamie "Allie" Grimsley, who died after losing control of her SUV.

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Slowing Down Speeders

Cars of Tomorrow

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- The high cost of hybrids has kept many people from going green, and a new Edmonds.com study shows that with the cost of gas -- combined with tax credits -- it only takes about three years to break even.

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Cars of Tomorrow

Unbreakable Bridges

BUFFALO, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There are nearly 600,000 bridges in the United States. Millions of people cross bridges every day without giving a second thought to their safety. But many of them could be taken down by a natural disaster like an earthquake or flooding or worse, by a terrorist attack.

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Unbreakable Bridges

Real-Life Baby Simulator

CHICAGO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- He cries, blinks and even breathes on his own! He's not real, but he sure looks it! This baby simulator is the newest way to train doctors, and it's about as close to the real thing as it gets.

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Real-Life Baby Simulator

Fighting Fire With Sound

HOUSTON (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- These students are on a mission. "We're experiencing zero gravity right now. It's also the only place you can do that besides outer space," says a student from University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.

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Fighting Fire With Sound

Voting Machines: Make Your Vote Count!

ASHBURN, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Does your vote really count? The topic of a reliable voting system has sparked some heated debates. Now, new electronic voting machines are unveiled, tested and graded.

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Voting Machines: Make Your Vote Count!

Putting Everyday Products to the Test

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There's a field based on psychology and engineering called human factors. Its mission? To determine how easy -- or hard -- it is for you to use everyday products.

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Putting Everyday Products to the Test

Wireless Tumor Tracker

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Ready, set, radiate! Seems simple enough, but doctors say there's a lot of guesswork that goes into delivering radiation to cancer patients. They can't always pinpoint a tumor's exact spot and know exactly how much radiation hits it.

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Wireless Tumor Tracker

Breakthrough for Breathing

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Most healthy people take for granted the simple act of breathing, but anyone with respiratory problems knows how precious each breath is to their existence. Patients often rely on traditional ventilators, but they sometimes cause more problems than solutions. Now, a new technology may make breathing ... a breeze.

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Breakthrough for Breathing

The Future of Underwater Robots

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A Russian submarine is trapped at the bottom of the sea, hurricanes crumble weak levees, and pipes leak. Most of these situations are too dangerous to send in a diver to investigate, but robots are becoming a reality. The military is using them on a daily basis, and now, the newest wave of robots may be diving into the ocean.

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The Future of Underwater Robots

Rip Current Secrets Revealed

NEWARK, Del. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Each year, an estimated 100 people drown in ocean rip currents. A strong current can sweep even the strongest swimmer out to sea. Researchers are now making waves studying rip currents, revealing the life-saving information you need to know about these dangerous ocean currents.

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Rip Current Secrets Revealed

Building Better Dams

DELFT, Netherlands (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- We are just heading into what is traditionally the worst part of hurricane season. But is New Orleans ready? When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, levees broke; homes crumbled. Now the levees need to be replaced by stronger ones.

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Building Better Dams

Dancing With Robots

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Orthopedic injuries are among the most common reasons people visit the doctor. Whether it's pain in the knee, hip or shoulder, doctors have a difficult time making an exact diagnosis without surgery. Now a new robot could make treating an injury more precise.

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Dancing With Robots

Wasps: Man's New Best Friend?

ATHENS, Ga. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Wasps are not man's best friend -- probably their worst. But when it comes to sniffing out trouble, scientists believe they may be better than dogs.

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Wasps: Man's New Best Friend?
On Your Mark, Get Set, Go!

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- To get from one place to another, we walk or run without thinking much about why. But these two engineers did wonder why humans move the way we do.

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On Your Mark, Get Set, Go!

Drunk and Behind the Wheel

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Each year, 17,000 people are killed because someone drove while drunk or on drugs, and 1.4 million Americans are arrested for driving under the influence. Some just get a ticket or lose their license. Others end up with more serious consequences. Now a high-tech go-cart may help put the brakes on impaired drivers.

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Drunk and Behind the Wheel

Robot Walks on Water

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Nature inspires many things, from fashion to perfume to furniture. Now, technology gets a little inspiration.

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Robot Walks on Water

Cheaper Drugs

ITHACA, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- As we all know, pharmaceuticals are not cheap. Part of the reason is developing the right formula is a process that can cost over a billion dollars. This biomedical engineer at Cornell University found a way that could revolutionize the way drugs are tested -- and help make them cheaper.

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Cheaper Drugs

First Responders Go WiFi

PHILADELPHIA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- In an emergency, seconds count. Wireless communication systems can help responders save lives. During 9-11, communication was challenging because the communications were destroyed in the attack. Researchers say a wireless system may be the answer.

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First Responders Go WiFi

Nanotechnology? What's That?!

MADISON, Wis. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Nanotechnology is the big buzz word in the world of science. It's going to impact just about everything we do, touch and see. And this next big thing is extraordinarily small.

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Nanotechnology? What's That?!

Battle of the 'Bots

HARTFORD, Conn. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- In a battle of electronics, engineering and a little fire, one of the biggest amateur robot competitions heats up. It's a battle of the 'bots ... and the 'bot-minded!

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Battle of the 'Bots

Blue Jean Insulation

HACKENSACK, N.J. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Skinny jeans. Fat jeans. Designer jeans ... Jeans in your walls? Your favorite jeans may keep you walking in comfort in more ways than one.

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Blue Jean Insulation

Making Hospitals Quieter

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- You wouldn't have surgery at a baseball game, but a new study shows hospital noise levels are equivalent to a sporting event.

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Making Hospitals Quieter

The New Virtual Reality

SEATTLE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A new virtual reality device lets you move around your virtual environment by actually walking, running, jumping and rolling without bumping into objects in the room.

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The New Virtual Reality

Back In The Game

BLACKSBURG, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When the star player of a sports team gets hurt, the whole team can suffer. Now, a new, high-tech approach to protect fragile bones can get injured players back into the game.

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Back In The Game

Smart Pants

BLACKSBURG, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- You get a cell phone call and your sleeve answers it. You want to know how far you jogged and your pants tell you. Smart clothes are the latest trend to come down the runway.

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Smart Pants
Forest Robot Fleet

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- More than 80-percent of the earth's natural forests have been destroyed, and research shows 45 percent of lakes are too polluted to be safe for drinking, fishing or even swimming. We all know our environment is changing, but there's still a lot to learn. With new technology, we may soon have a clearer picture of exactly what's happening.

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Forest Robot Fleet

Breaking Sound Barriers

WHEATON, Maryland (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There are over 28 million deaf and hard-of-hearing Americans, yet there are still communication barriers between the deaf and the hearing world. Now, a new technology is breaking sound barriers and lending a helping hand to the hearing impaired.

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Breaking Sound Barriers

Gadgets Getting Smaller

SUNNYVALE, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Experts say we're no longer in the technology revolution, but in the technology evolution. The next step is to make everything we use shrink. That's why gadgets, like cell phones and laptops, get smaller and smaller, yet can do more.

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Gadgets Getting Smaller

Traffic Reports From Your Cell   Phone

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Frustrated and stuck in a traffic tie-up? Now, your cell phone might be able to get you out of it. Commuters trapped in traffic might find relief on the phone with a new technology that's helping unlock highway gridlock.

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Traffic Reports From Your Cell Phone

Cars of the Future: Designers

DETROIT (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Imaginations are let loose on car designs of the future. Now, young, creative minds are pushing automotive design to its limits, using every shape, color and size in their creations.

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Cars of the Future: Designers

Cars of the Future: Plastic Makes   Perfect?

TROY, Mich. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Cars built entirely out of plastic could be the wave of the future, making metal a thing of the past when it comes to cars.

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Cars of the Future: Plastic Makes Perfect?

Detecting Toxins: Saving Lives

BOSTON (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- The most dangerous and deadly things may not be what we see, but what we don't. Now, a new device may be the early alert that helps save lives!

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Detecting Toxins: Saving Lives

Lights of the Future

TROY, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Do you know what your home will look like in the future? The future is now here with new lights that almost never have to be changed.

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Lights of the Future
Waking up Teens!

TROY, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Teenagers are notorious for staying up late, hitting the snooze button and always running late. Now, however, new research shows they can adjust to a schedule simply by sitting in front of a light.

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Waking Up Teens

Protecting Your Hair

COLUMBUS, Ohio (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- How much damage have you done to your hair? Let's face it; we all take our hair through the wringer. Conditioners are supposed to protect our hair and reverse some of the damage. Now, however, new research has found a better way for conditioners to do the job.

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Protecting Your Hair

Better Bridges

AMES, Iowa (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Bridges take a beating, and it can really break the bank to repair them. Now, researchers are breaking bridges to learn how to build them better and save you money.

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Better Bridges

Cleaning up our Water

SANTA MONICA, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Oil, grease, deadly bacteria and disease are all found in our ponds, rivers, lakes and oceans. Now, a new invention may be the first step to cleaning up our water.

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Cleaning up our Water

Inside the Preemie Brain

SAN FRANCISCO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Babies born prematurely face a host of health concerns, including future developmental problems. Now, a new kind of incubator helps doctors get a better look inside premature babies' brains.

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Inside the Preemie Brain

New Road Signs

PHILADELPHIA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Road signs come in all shapes and sizes but just because they are big it doesn't mean they're easy to see. Now, a new look will help you see the signs more clearly.

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New Road Signs

Wind Farms Impacting Weather

DURHAM, N.C. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- You've seen the prices at the pump go up and now home heating costs are on the rise. And scientists are looking to the wind for a much needed alternative to fuel.

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Wind Farms Impacting Weather

Smart Sensors for Disasters

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When something's wrong in the human body, the brain lets us know we're hurt, but what happens if something goes wrong inside a building or bridge? Now, smart sensors may be able to diagnose the health of structures.

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Smart Sensors for Disasters

More Fuel-Efficient Cars

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- High gas prices are forcing consumers to fork over fistfuls of cash at the pump. In fact, AAA says prices are now a dollar more than this time last year. Now, a new car technology might offer some relief when filling up your car at the pump.

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More Fuel-Efficient Cars

Gas Mask Sensor

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Firefighters put their lives on the line everyday protecting us from harm. Now, a new device helps protect them.

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Gas Mask Sensor
Perfect-Fit Piano

LINCOLN, Neb. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Piano players' hands come in all shapes and sizes, but piano keyboards don't. Small hands are defined as having a hand span of eight inches or less. If you fit into this category it's likely you may have a hard time playing the piano. Now there is new piano keyboard that's just the right size.

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Perfect-Fit Piano

Blimps in Space

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- You see them floating above football stadiums, but blimps are now being used for more than games: They're a cheap and safe way to get a bird's-eye view of the ground below. Recently, some students have decided to take their science class outdoors, putting a class assignment to the test and helping to send blimps into near space.

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Blimps in Space

Unbreakable Glass

MURRAY HILL, N.J. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It's an unlikely discovery at the bottom of the sea that could strengthen our future; unbreakable glass.

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Unbreakable Glass

Prosthetic Bones

DALLAS (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Not long ago, bone cancer often meant amputation. Now researchers have found a little pressure can go a long way in saving a leg. A new treatment can help keep parts of the limb while allowing it to grow.

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Prosthetic Bones

Screens of the Future

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- If you're getting ready to buy a new cell phone, computer monitor or TV, this new technology will change everything. A new type of screen is hitting the market. It's called OLED, or organic light-emitting diode, and it's a term you're going to see a lot of in the next few years.

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Screens of the Future

Robotic Bugs

WASHINGTON (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- To most of us, cockroaches are a nasty nuisance. But engineers are now using them as role models for designing robots with cockroach-like antennas that help them scurry along walls, turn corners, avoid obstacles, and feel their way through the dark.

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Robotic Bugs

New Combat Helmet

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Helmets used during combat have been protecting soldiers' heads for decades but very little has changed over the years. Engineers are giving helmets an overhaul and improving the safety of soldiers in the line of duty.

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New Combat Helmet

Wireless Wonders

LAS VEGAS (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Tired of your slow wireless Internet and network connections that get bogged down? The next generation of WiFi technology is here, and it may be the best solution yet for our overloaded information super-highways.

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Wireless Wonders

Reducing Airplane Noise

WASHINGTON (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- You don't have to live right next door to an airport to hear the roar of jetliners cruising overhead. Now, engineers have unveiled a new landing plan called continuous descent approach that may help our friendly skies be a little quieter.

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Reducing Airplane Noise

Mouse Adapter for Tremors

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- For many of us, using a computer mouse is second nature. But not for the millions of Americans who suffer from tremors because of conditions like stroke, Parkinson's disease, and head injuries. Now a new product helps make navigating a PC easier.

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Mouse Adapter for Tremors

Longer-Lasting Battery

(Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- We live in a digital world, relying on batteries to power everything from laptops to digital cameras and MP3. Standard batteries drain under the strain. Now engineers have developed a longer-lasting battery just for these digital demands.

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Longer Lasting Battery

Robotic Arm for Stroke Victims

TEMPE, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It strikes without warning and can kill within seconds. Over 750,000 Americans suffer a stroke each year. Most survive, but many are left unable to walk or use their arms. Now a discovery and breakthrough in science could change their lives.

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Robotic Arm for Stroke Victims

The New Generation of Scientists

PHOENIX (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Future scientists, engineers and inventors are already displaying advanced technologies around the United States and science and engineering fairs, and some of the latest hi-tech inventions are coming from kids.

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The New Generation of Scientists

Smart Gun

NEWARK, N.J. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Many Americans keep a gun in the house for safety, but the National Safety Council reports nine children are killed every day from gun violence. Now, a new smart gun technology may help keep guns from going off in the wrong hands.

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Smart Gun

Cell Phone Viruses

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It takes constant vigilance to combat the viruses that persistently lurk in cyber space. While we all know our PCs are vulnerable to data loss, you might be surprised to find out so is your cell phone! A new technology could be the key to ferreting out electronic viruses forever.

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Cell Phone Viruses

Shark-Inspired Boat Surface

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- In the boating industry, a huge problem exists that can be summed up in three words -- algae, barnacles and slime. Until now, the only way to prevent these organisms from growing was toxic paint. But researchers are studying a more natural approach that's inspired by the ocean's fiercest predator.

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Shark-Inspired Boat Surface
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