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TV REPORTS - Computer Science
  

Tracking With Twitter: You Are What You Tweet

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire)--Everyday 200 million people use Twitter to send out tweets on everything from politics, to the weather, to the latest Hollywood gossip. But there could be more to Twitter than just a random flood of chit-chat. We’ll tell you how your tweets are being tracked, revealing some surprising patterns.

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Tracking With Twitter: You Are What You Tweet

Turn Down The Volume - Quiet Commercials

BOSTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Have you ever noticed you’re watching TV and wham! A commercial comes on and it’s just so loud! For years we’ve complained about it. New regulations have passed to try and tune it down…but now, that power could be in your control. A new software program may be just what consumers ordered.

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Turn Down The Volume - Quiet Commercials

Movie Making: Is It Real Or Is It Digital?

CLEMSON, S.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Advances in digital technology continue to happen all the time in the movies, with one breakthrough seemingly outdoing the last. Special effects in movies are so good that many viewers can't tell the difference between what's real and what's fake. We’ll show you the latest in movie technology – you won't believe your eyes.

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Movie Making: Is It Real Or Is It Digital?

Opening Eyes and Doors for the Blind

PHOENIX (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Fourteen million Americans are either legally blind or have low vision. Less than half of them are employed and experts say inaccessibility to education is a big reason why. We met up with one student who is using science and technology to open eyes and doors, for those who need it most.

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Opening Eyes and Doors for the Blind

New Virtual Dentists

(Ivanhoe Newswire) --Got any missing teeth? About 25 percent of adults 60 and older no longer have natural teeth. 30 million are missing teeth in one or both jaws. Now, more and more of them are saying no to removable dentures, and yes to dental implants, tiny screws that are placed in the jaw to hold permanent prosthetic teeth. And as implant dentistry is becoming the standard of care, there’s a new way to teach dental students how to get the best result.

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New Virtual Dentists

Computer Concerts? Making Modern Music From A Classic Vibe

Raleigh, N.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Artists from Beethoven to Count Basie to the Beatles have changed music, one song at a time, and found a permanent place in our culture. Even when the musicians are long gone, their fans will go to almost any lengths to keep the music alive. In 2011, that can mean sampling or even science.

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Computer Concerts? Making Modern Music From A Classic Vibe

Perfection On The Ice

NEWARK, DE (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Landing the perfect triple axel or double Lutz on the ice takes years of practice. Even competitive skaters end up with bruises from missed jumps and spins. Next, we'll tell you how technology hits the ice to help skaters perfect their moves.

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Perfection On The Ice

Saving Lives: Detecting Lung Cancer Faster

BALTIMORE, MD ( Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Each year, more people die from lung cancer than breast cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer combined. Early detection is key to beating the disease. Now, a new technology is helping detect lung cancer tumors earlier.

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Saving Lives: Detecting Lung Cancer Faster

GPS Tracks Asthma Attacks

WASHINGTON, DC (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- 20 million people in America suffer from asthma. An attack can happen at any time and can be frightening. Now a new device may help prevent and track asthma attacks.

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GPS Tracks Asthma Attacks

Smart Doctors Office: Back to the Future

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- This year, the typical American family of four with health insurance will spend almost $3,000 out-of-pocket on healthcare, and costs keep going up. Though you're spending more money on medical expenses, you're probably spending less time with the doctor. As practices get bigger, doctors have less time for each patient. Now, new research on doctor's offices and their efficiency finds that bigger may not mean better.

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Smart Doctors Office: Back to the Future

Giving Autistic Kids A Voice

GRANADA, Spain (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It's estimated one out of every 150 babies born in the United States will develop autism. A new case is diagnosed every 20 minutes. One of the biggest challenges for parents and therapists is understanding what an autistic child is feeling or thinking. Now video games and even robots are closing the communication gap.

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Giving Autistic Kids A Voice

Tracking the Flu

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The number of people getting hit by the flu virus keeps growing. It's impossible to accurately predict how fast or how far the spread of the disease will go.

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Tracking the Flu

911! Get Help Faster

DECATUR, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you needed help in an emergency, how fast would fire and rescue crews get to you? There is no national standard for emergency response times. Depending on where you live, city or country, it could be minutes, or much longer. Now researchers are looking at new ways to put first responders closer to where they're needed.

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911! Get Help Faster

Medics Preparing For War

COLUMBUS, OH (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- To date, almost 32,000 troops have been wounded in the Iraq war, but training National Guard medics here in the United States to care for the wounded in a war zone is far from actually being in the battlefield. New human simulators are helping medics get prepared.

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Medics Preparing For War

Calming Fears – Virtually!

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Nearly 40 million people over the age of 18 suffer from an anxiety disorder, which includes everything from panic disorders to phobias.

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Calming Fears – Virtually!

The Future of TV: Hidden Commercials?

¬PALO ALTO, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- TiVo helps us skip the commercials. Now advertisers are finding more creative ways to get their message across. The latest trend in advertising is product placement. Instead of a Coca Cola commercial, you'll see your favorite TV star drinking it. But now, the product doesn't really have to be in the scene to be seen.

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The Future of TV: Hidden Commercials?

Traffic Intersections Gaining Speed

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Wherever you drive, chances are you end up sitting in traffic -- and it's not just on highways. Congested intersections nationwide are on the rise and getting worse. As a result, better intersection designs are gaining speed all over the country.

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Traffic Intersections Gaining Speed

Summer Storm Watch

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You've heard of Doppler and VIPIR, but even the best forecast systems can't necessarily tell you if a severe storm is going to hit your neighborhood. Now, atmospheric scientists have discovered that clouds' colors could hold the key to more accurate predictions of when and exactly where storms will hit.

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Summer Storm Watch

Robots Helping Stroke Survivors

BOSTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Six months after a stroke is when most insurance companies stop paying for a patient's physical therapy. That's because many health professionals believe by then, the patient has reached peak rehabilitation. But now researchers say a new robotic device proves patients can rehabilitate for years.

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Robots Helping Stroke Survivors

Tracking Sex Offenders

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- They are startling facts -- one in five girls and one in seven boys will become the victims of sexual abuse by the age of 18. Records of where sex offenders live are mostly outdated or inaccurate, but police now have a new tool to help keep your kids safe from predators.

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Tracking Sex Offenders

Video Games Save Lives

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Forget the stethoscope. The videogame controller could be the newest item you find in your doctor's black bag. Videogames could make the difference when medical teams are faced with a crisis.

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Videogames Save Lives

Pimp My Program: Help for the Disabled

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You've heard of "Pimp My Ride" where they customize a car to meet the exact needs of the driver. Researchers have taken that same idea and applied it to various computer programs, creating an interface that can speed up computing no matter what your ability.

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Pimp My Program: Help for the Disabled

No More Delayed Departures

LEXINGTON, Mass. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Flying can be stressful. Add in thunder and lightning, and it's bound to strike a nerve. Now, physicists are helping find the friendliest route in those sometimes unfriendly skies.

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No More Delayed Departures

Cool School Where Peace Rules

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Amid growing concern surrounding the effects violent video games have on children, a new computer game could be the alternative parents have been waiting for.

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Cool School Where Peace Rules

Gamers Saving Lives

SEATTLE (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- What if instead of waging war or dropping blocks, gamers set their sights on something like a new HIV vaccine? Sounds strange, but biochemistry might be the new must-play video game.

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Gamers Saving Lives

Patients go Wireless for Faster Recovery

BALTIMORE, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Most patients who undergo joint replacement surgery need physical therapy to recover, a process that takes patients away from their bedside health monitors; but a new device is making it possible to safely monitor patients back to health.

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Patients go Wireless for Faster Recovery

Cell Phones Manage Diabetes

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- People with diabetes struggle to control their blood sugar and other complications, and sometimes need help managing their illness. Now, their cell phone can help keep them healthy.

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Cell Phones Manage Diabetes

Feeling Through Your Computer

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- When you use a computer you’re obviously able to see and hear the information on the screen. Now, you can touch it. A newly designed device lets computer users feel the texture and movement of what they are seeing in front of them.

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Feeling Through Your Computer

Blood Test For Breast Cancer

DALLAS, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A new blood test could tell you if you have breast cancer before it shows up on a mammogram.

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Blood Test For Breast Cancer

New Generation of Crash Test Dummies

ASBURN, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Traditional crash test dummies have been used since the early 1950s to help study injuries from car crashes, but there's been little change in dummy design. Now, researchers are developing smart, new dummy technology.

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New Generation of Crash Test Dummies

Avoiding Rear-End Collisions

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you spend a lot of time in traffic, chances are you've either had or almost had a traffic accident. One of the most common kinds of accidents are rear-end collisions. There were one-point-eight million of them in 2006 -- that's 29-percent of all the injury crashes in the United States; but now, researchers say they may be on the road to preventing them.

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Avoiding Rear-End Collisions

Protect Yourself From Computer Hackers

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you have a computer connected to the Internet, watch out! You'll be surprised to learn how often it's being attacked by computer hackers. Ivanhoe explains how to protect yourself and your PC.

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Protect Yourself From Computer Hackers

High-tech Classroom

COLUMBUS, Ohio (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Class notes, textbooks, and lectures are all in one place for some high school students -- in their tablet personal computers or tablet PC's. But is this technology helping their grades? We uncover one surprising drawback.

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High-tech Classroom

Dangerous Decibels

PORTLAND, Ore. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Do you know how loud that music is your child is listening to? You probably don't and you probably don't know it could be loud enough to permanently damage their hearing. But one young woman is getting her peers to listen to her message about dangerous decibels.

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Dangerous Decibels

Hands-free Computer Mouse

SEATTLE, Wash. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Simple sounds matched with new software are helping people get where they want to go … and it's all hands-free.

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Hands-free Computer Mouse

Driver Distraction

MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Distracted drivers are all over the roads. It’s estimated that 25 percent of car accidents are due to some form of distraction while driving. Now, a simulated driver course could help make roads safer.

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Driver Distraction

Videogames for National Security

CHICAGO (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You'd be hard-pressed to find anyone -- kids and adults alike -- who hasn't played at least one video game. They're a multi-million dollar industry. But video games aren't just for entertainment anymore. Public health officials say gaming is vital when it comes to preparing for national disasters.

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Videogames for National Security

Driverless Car

BERLIN (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You've seen cars with rear-view cameras, even cars that can parallel park themselves … but imagine seeing a car completely drive itself!

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Driverless Car

Autism Caught on Tape

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Autism affects one in every 165 children. For the parents and teachers of those boys and girls … knowing what works and what doesn’t can be key to their development. Now, new technology is helping them help these kids.

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Autism Caught on Tape

Digital Grandparents

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The United States is in the middle of a longevity revolution. The average person is expected to live to be 77. Boomers will hit 65 in 2011. Homes are going high tech to help us as we grow older.

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Digital Grandparents

Home of the Future

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- What does your future look like? Here's a look at what some of the leading scientists are working on today to bring into your homes tomorrow.

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Home of the Future

3-D Dental Implants

Baltimore, M.D. -- About 100 million Americans are missing teeth. But dentures or crowns can look un-natural and don’t last forever.

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3-D Dental Implants

Catching Heart Problems

Chicago, Ill. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Defibrillators save lives for people with a heart condition. These patients have a thin line between life and death. Now, new wireless technology allows doctors to monitor their vital signs and implantable devices from anywhere, anytime. Judy Borland used to live in fear her heart would stop beating.

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Catching Heart Problems

Man Behind The Pc

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- IBM fellow and Vice President of the Almaden research center, Dr. Mark Dean, built his 1965 Cobra replica with his own two hands. He is also known to his colleagues -- and the world -- as the creator of the PC. That desktop computer you use on a daily basis -- Dean is the man that put it all into one box.

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Man Behind The Pc

Finding a Whatchamacallit on the Web

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Whether you need a bolt, a motor, a belt or a tool, finding the perfect, hard-to-describe part can be like finding a needle in a haystack. But now, engineers have put together a computer program that can track down just about anything you need -- even if you don't know what it's called!

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Finding a Whatchamacallit on the Web

Helping the Blind "See"

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Roughly 10 million Americans are either blind or visually impaired. Mobility training teaches them to use canes and Seeing Eye dogs, but just exploring a new street or a different area of town can be daunting.

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Helping the Blind

New Disaster Warning Standard

RESTON, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When a natural disaster strikes, watch out! Buildings crumble, roads are swept away, and homes and lives can be destroyed in seconds.

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New Disaster Warning Standard

Sports Injury Prevention Performance

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Football is a tough game. One hard hit can take you out for the season, and nobody knows that better than number 32, Willie Byrd.

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Sports Injury Prevention Performance

Is Your Drinking Water Contaminated?

OLYMPIA, Wash. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- If our drinking water supply is contaminated, accidentally or intentionally, a spill response team goes to work, getting the situation under control as quickly as possible. Now new computer software is helping make the response even quicker -- all across the country.

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E. coli Hand-Held Sensor

Detecting Deadly Chemicals

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Whether it's a murder, a break-in, or an anthrax scare, investigators trying to solve a crime are burdened with collecting delicate, sometimes toxic evidence. Next, cynthia demos shows us a new device that does all the work.

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Detecting Deadly Chemicals

Virtual Reality for Navigation Skills

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Are you one of those people who needs a map and a compass to travel, but still manage to get lost? Or can you find your way around easily, with little help to guide the way? Now, vision researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore want to find out why some people are better at navigating than others.

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Virtual Reality for Navigation Skills

Mona Lisa: Smiling?

AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Computers are becoming more and more like humans! Now, new technology allows them to detect what we're feeling!

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Mona Lisa: Smiling?

First Responders Go WiFi

PHILADELPHIA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- In an emergency, seconds count. Wireless communication systems can help responders save lives. During 9-11, communication was challenging because the communications were destroyed in the attack. Researchers say a wireless system may be the answer.

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First Responders Go WiFi

Security at Your Fingertips

FAIRFAX, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Online hackers can steal just about anything, from your identity, to your credit cards and bank balance. Now, consumers can fight back. Using the power of touch can protect your personal information.

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Security at Your Fingertips

Thief-Proofing Your Laptop

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It's a nightmare that can happen in the blink of an eye. Your laptop is stolen, and chances are, it's not coming back. More than 700,000 laptops are stolen each year, but now electrical and computer engineers have a new, tiny motion sensor that tracks your laptop's every move.

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Thief-Proofing Your Laptop

Life-Sized Holograms

AUSTIN, Texas (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Once just a sticker collector's novelty, holograms are taking on a whole new dimension. These new digital 3-D hologram images may be the key to inventing new cars, designing buildings, and mapping entire cities!

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Life-Sized Holograms

Science or Art?

NEW YORK (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It's a cross between an iPod and a record player. Here's one CD case you probably haven't seen before.

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Science or Art?

The New Virtual Reality

SEATTLE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A new virtual reality device lets you move around your virtual environment by actually walking, running, jumping and rolling without bumping into objects in the room.

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The New Virtual Reality

Gadgets Getting Smaller

SUNNYVALE, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Experts say we're no longer in the technology revolution, but in the technology evolution. The next step is to make everything we use shrink. That's why gadgets, like cell phones and laptops, get smaller and smaller, yet can do more.

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Gadgets Getting Smaller

Medical Records on Your Cell Phone

SAN DIEGO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Imagine if your medical records were lost or misplaced. It can cause more than aggravation; it could impact the care you receive. Now, imagine being able to download your own health records -- even X-rays and diagnostic scans -- right into your cell phone or PDA.

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Medical Records on Your Cell Phone

Predicting Alzheimer's

NEW YORK CITY (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Alzheimer's is a devastating illness affecting 4 million Americans and their families. Would you want to know if Alzheimer's is in your future? Now, a new twist to a common and inexpensive test may tell relatives if they, too, will suffer from the mind-altering disease.

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Predicting Alzheimer's

Traffic Reports From Your Cell   Phone

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Frustrated and stuck in a traffic tie-up? Now, your cell phone might be able to get you out of it. Commuters trapped in traffic might find relief on the phone with a new technology that's helping unlock highway gridlock.

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Traffic Reports From Your Cell Phone

Cars of the Future: Plastic Makes   Perfect?

TROY, Mich. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Cars built entirely out of plastic could be the wave of the future, making metal a thing of the past when it comes to cars.

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Cars of the Future: Plastic Makes Perfect?

Singing Coach

TAMPA, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Want to learn to sing? Now, your computer can coach you to carry a tune.

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Singing Coach

Detecting Breast Cancer Early

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Two-hundred thousand women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the United States. Mammograms, however, may not be the best way to detect it. Now, there's a new test to help doctors pinpoint and treat breast cancer.

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Detecting Breast Cancer Early

Predicting Successful Surgeries

STANFORD, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- People are as different on the inside as they are on the outside, making it difficult to predict which heart surgery will help which patient. Now, a new, high-tech approach may predict which patients will and will not have successful surgeries.

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Predicting Successful Surgeries

Virtual Reality Field Trips

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A trip to the beach, a walk in the woods, a hike in the mountains -- sound extreme for your child's field trip? Not anymore, virtual reality field trips are now making these types of trips possible.

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Virtual Reality Field Trips

Space Pilot For Computers

NEWARK, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- If you're one of the 10 million to 20 million professional computer users in the United States, chances are you've experienced muscle stress, carpel tunnel, or pain from just doing your job. A new invention may save your hands and arms from hurting.

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Space Pilot For Computers

Hi-Tech Typing

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It seems like everyone has one a cell phone, personal computer or I-pod, but what if you couldn't use these devices. What if a car crash, stroke or accident made it nearly impossible for you to use small computers? Now, a new device is making life easier for disabled Americans.

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Hi-Tech Typing

Protect Yourself: Fighting Computer   Crime

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It's the crime of the future, and it's happening right now. However, now there is someone trying to stop it. Markus Jakobsson, Ph.D., computer scientist at Indiana University School of Informatics in Bloomington, Ind., says: "We're the good guy. We make the move. Then we go over to the other side of the table, and we're the bad guys. We make the move."

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Protect Yourself: Fighting Computer Crime

Changing the Face of History

MOUNT VERNON, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- If a picture tells a thousand words then the portrait of America's first president, George Washington, may be telling a lie. Scientists are giving our founding father a virtual face-lift and revealing some surprising new looks.

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Changing the Face of History

Detecting Concussions on the   Sidelines

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A big hit during a football game ... The impact of a car crash. Both can cause serious head injuries.

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Detecting Concussions on the Sidelines

TERC Sensor

WORCHESTER, Mass. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- If you're a soldier in a noisy tank or chopper, clear communication can mean the difference between life and death. That's why the Defense Department asked engineers to come up with a new version of the non-acoustical sensor. This device could change communication on the battlefield and even in the workplace.

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TERC Sensor

Save Energy at Your PC

BERKELEY, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Most of us are familiar with the snooze button on an alarm clock. Imagine having one for your computer that's easy to figure out. Scientists have developed a standard that could help you put your computer down for nap. And you'd be amazed at how much money it can save.

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Save Energy at Your PC
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