Medical Breakthroughs Reported by Ivanhoe.com. Click here to go to the homepage.
Be the First to Know. Click here to subscribe FREE!
Search Reports: Use quotation marks around your multi-word search terms in the box below to perform search of Ivanhoe.com.
Advances in health and medicine.Use " marks around search terms
 
What's New
News Flash
Discussion
healthchannelnews
  Alternative Health
Arthritis
Asthma & Allergies
Autism
Breast Cancer
Cancer
Cardiovascular Health
Children's Health
Dental Health
Diabetes
Fertility & Pregnancy
Men's Health
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Nutrition & Wellness
Orthopedics
Pet Health
Robotics
Seniors' Health
Sports Medicine
Vision
Women's Health
Advances in health and medicine.
Click here to sign up for Medical Alerts!
Click below to access other news from Ivanhoe Broadcast News.
  Click here to get Ivanhoe's Medical Headline RSS feed Click here to listen to Ivanhoe's Medical Podcasts
Useful Links
Play It Again, Please
E-Mail a Friend
Order Books Online
Inside Science
Smart Woman
Advances in health and medicine.
Smart Woman Home
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Smart Woman Home
Advances in health and medicine.
Click below to learn about Ivanhoe.
  Awards
About Us
Contact Us
Employment
Feedback
Ivanhoe FAQ
Our TV Partners
Travel Calendar
Advances in health and medicine.
Ivanhoe celebrates 20 years of medical news reporting reaching nearly 80 million TV households each week. Click here to learn more...
Advances in health and medicine.
Marjorie Bekaert Thomas
Publisher/President
Advances in health and medicine.
Advertisement
Neurological Disorders Channel
Reported April 17, 2012

Drug Predicts Alzheimer's Disease?

(Ivanhoe Newswire)-- Having a loved one diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease can be devastating, especially without warning.

Now a recent study shows how doctors may be able to diagnose the disease earlier. Early detection would give more time for family members to prepare for the devastating disease.

Currently, Alzheimer's disease can only be definitively confirmed through the detection of amyloid plaques and/or tangles in the brain during autopsy after death or with a brain tissue biopsy. The new method uses the drug florbetaben as a tracer during a PET scan of the brain to visualize amyloid plaques during life.

The global phase III study directly compared brain regions in the PET scan to respective brain regions after death during autopsy to prove that the florbetaben PET scan detects beta-amyloid in the brain.

The study consisted of 200 participants nearing death (including both participants with suspected Alzheimer's disease and those without known dementia) and who were willing to donate their brain underwent MRI and florbetaben PET scan. The amount of plaque found in the 31 participants who reached autopsy was then compared to the results of the scans. A total of 186 brain regions from these donors were analyzed along with 60 brain regions from healthy volunteers. Based on these 246 brain regions the study found florbetaben to detect beta-amyloid with a sensitivity of 77 percent and a specificity of 94 percent.
 
After comparing the visual assessment method proposed for florbetaben for clinical practice with the post mortem diagnosis a sensitivity of 100 percent and a specificity of 92 percent was revealed. Sensitivity is the percentage of actual positives that are correctly identified as positive, and specificity is the percentage of negatives that are correctly identified.

"These results confirm that florbetaben is able to detect beta-amyloid plaques in the brain during life with great accuracy and is a suitable biomarker," Marwan Sabbagh, MD, study author director of Banner Sun Health Research Institute in Sun City, Arizona, was quoted as saying. "This is an easy, non-invasive way to assist an Alzheimer's diagnosis at an early stage. Also exciting is the possibility of using florbetaben as tool in future therapeutic clinical research studies where therapy goals focus on reducing levels of beta-amyloid in the brain."

SOURCE: American Academy of Neurology's 64th Annual Meeting, April 15, 2012



 

Related Articles in Latest Medical News:

[ Back to Neurological Disorders Channel Home ]

MEDICAL ALERT!
Stay up to date on Neurological Disorders. We can notify you every time there is a medical breakthrough. Click here to sign up.
EDITOR'S CHOICE
Advertisement

Follow Us On:

Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Twitter page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Facebook page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's YouTube page

Home | What's New | News Flash | Search/Latest Medical News | E-Mail Medical Alerts!
Ivanhoe FAQ | Privacy Policy | Our TV Partners | Awards | Useful Links | Play It Again, Please
RSS Feeds | Advertising/Sponsorships | Content Syndication | Reprints

Advances in health and medicine.
webdoctor@ivanhoe.com
Copyright © 2014 Ivanhoe Broadcast News, Inc.
2745 West Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(407) 740-0789

P.O. Box 865
Orlando, Florida 32802

Premium Content in Latest Medical News Denotes Premium Content in Latest Medical News