Medical Breakthroughs Reported by Ivanhoe.com. Click here to go to the homepage.
Be the First to Know. Click here to subscribe FREE!
Search Reports: Use quotation marks around your multi-word search terms in the box below to perform search of Ivanhoe.com.
Advances in health and medicine.Use " marks around search terms
 
What's New
News Flash
Discussion
healthchannelnews
  Alternative Health
Arthritis
Asthma & Allergies
Autism
Breast Cancer
Cancer
Cardiovascular Health
Children's Health
Dental Health
Diabetes
Fertility & Pregnancy
Men's Health
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Nutrition & Wellness
Orthopedics
Pet Health
Robotics
Seniors' Health
Sports Medicine
Vision
Women's Health
Advances in health and medicine.
Click here to sign up for Medical Alerts!
Click below to access other news from Ivanhoe Broadcast News.
  Click here to get Ivanhoe's Medical Headline RSS feed Click here to listen to Ivanhoe's Medical Podcasts
Useful Links
Play It Again, Please
E-Mail a Friend
Order Books Online
Inside Science
Smart Woman
Advances in health and medicine.
Smart Woman Home
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Smart Woman Home
Advances in health and medicine.
Click below to learn about Ivanhoe.
  Awards
About Us
Contact Us
Employment
Feedback
Ivanhoe FAQ
Our TV Partners
Travel Calendar
Advances in health and medicine.
Ivanhoe celebrates 20 years of medical news reporting reaching nearly 80 million TV households each week. Click here to learn more...
Advances in health and medicine.
Marjorie Bekaert Thomas
Publisher/President
Advances in health and medicine.
Advertisement
Breast Cancer Channel
Reported February 24, 2012

Breast Cancer Survival with Mammography

(Ivanhoe Newswire)-- Discovering breast cancer can be devastating to women, but discovering it through mammography may give them a better chance of survival.

Based on a study of almost 2,000 breast cancer patients, researchers at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle say that, in women between the ages of 40 and 49, breast cancers detected by mammography have a better prognosis.

"In our study, women aged 40 to 49 whose breast cancer was detected by mammography were easier to treat and had less recurring disease and mortality, because their cancer was found at an earlier stage," Judith A. Malmgren, Ph.D., president of HealthStat Consulting, Inc, was quoted as saying.

Researchers evaluated data on 1,977 breast cancer patients between the ages of 40 and 49 who were treated between 1990 and 2008. The researchers looked at method of diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, treatment, and annual follow-up information, including recurrence of disease.

"Our goal was to assess the differences between mammography and non-mammography detected breast cancer, to determine whether earlier detection confers a treatment and morbidity advantage because the disease is found at an earlier stage," Dr. Malmgren said.

The study showed a notable increase in the percentage of mammography-detected breast cancer over the 18-year period: from 28 percent in 1990 to 58 percent in 2008. Over the same period, patient- and physician-detected breast cancer declined from 73 percent of all cases in 1990 to 42 percent in 2008.

"The shift toward more mammography-detected breast cancer cases was accompanied by a shift toward diagnosis at an earlier stage of disease that required less treatment," Dr. Malmgren was quoted as saying.

During the 18-year period, the amount of breast cancers diagnosed at Stage 0 increased by 66 percent, while the number of Stage III breast cancers decreased by 66 percent. The majority of Stage 0 cancer cases were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-invasive cancer that is confined to a milk duct. The treatment of DCIS remains arguable, because not all experts agree that it is possibly deadly.

Dr. Malmgren said another key finding of the study was the extent of treatment patients received. Compared with women whose cancer was self-detected or discovered by a physician, patients whose cancer was detected using mammography were more likely to have breast-conserving treatment and less likely to have chemotherapy. Specifically, they were more likely to undergo lumpectomy (67 percent versus 48 percent), less likely to undergo modified radical mastectomy (25 percent versus 47 percent), and less likely to die of breast cancer (4 percent versus 11 percent).

"The benefits of breast cancer treatment are accompanied by significant damage," Dr. Malmgren said. "Chemotherapy may have long-lasting toxic effects on a woman's body, and mastectomy and reconstructive surgery are difficult and expensive operations that can have a significant effect on body image."

The American Cancer Society recommends that women start receiving annual mammograms to check for breast cancer beginning at age 40. In 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued controversial new guidelines that eliminated the longstanding recommendation for routine mammography screening for women between the ages of 40 and 49, stating that the benefits of screening were possibly outnumbered by the dangers of screening, such as false-positive results.

"The objective of screening is to detect disease at an earlier, more treatable stage, which—based on our review—mammography accomplishes," Dr. Malmgren said.

SOURCE: Radiology, February 22, 2012


Related Articles in Latest Medical News:

[ Back to Breast Cancer Channel Home ]

MEDICAL ALERT!
Stay up to date on Breast Cancer. We can notify you every time there is a medical breakthrough. Click here to sign up.
EDITOR'S CHOICE
Advertisement

Follow Us On:

Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Twitter page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Facebook page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's YouTube page

How to Find a Qualified Mammography Provider

For the nearest FDA-certified mammography provider, or to check the status of your imaging center, call the NCI's CIS at (800) 4-CANCER.

Make remembering your breast exam time easy ...

Click Here

Home | What's New | News Flash | Search/Latest Medical News | E-Mail Medical Alerts!
Ivanhoe FAQ | Privacy Policy | Our TV Partners | Awards | Useful Links | Play It Again, Please
RSS Feeds | Advertising/Sponsorships | Content Syndication | Reprints

Advances in health and medicine.
webdoctor@ivanhoe.com
Copyright © 2014 Ivanhoe Broadcast News, Inc.
2745 West Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(407) 740-0789

P.O. Box 865
Orlando, Florida 32802

Premium Content in Latest Medical News Denotes Premium Content in Latest Medical News