Medical Breakthroughs Reported by Ivanhoe.com. Click here to go to the homepage.
Be the First to Know. Click here to subscribe FREE!
Search Reports: Use quotation marks around your multi-word search terms in the box below to perform search of Ivanhoe.com.
Advances in health and medicine.Use " marks around search terms
 
What's New
News Flash
Discussion
healthchannelnews
  Alternative Health
Arthritis
Asthma & Allergies
Autism
Breast Cancer
Cancer
Cardiovascular Health
Children's Health
Dental Health
Diabetes
Fertility & Pregnancy
Men's Health
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Nutrition & Wellness
Orthopedics
Pet Health
Robotics
Seniors' Health
Sports Medicine
Vision
Women's Health
Advances in health and medicine.
Click here to sign up for Medical Alerts!
Click below to access other news from Ivanhoe Broadcast News.
  Click here to get Ivanhoe's Medical Headline RSS feed Click here to listen to Ivanhoe's Medical Podcasts
Useful Links
Play It Again, Please
E-Mail a Friend
Order Books Online
Inside Science
Smart Woman
Advances in health and medicine.
Smart Woman Home
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Smart Woman Home
Advances in health and medicine.
Click below to learn about Ivanhoe.
  Awards
About Us
Contact Us
Employment
Feedback
Ivanhoe FAQ
Our TV Partners
Travel Calendar
Advances in health and medicine.
Ivanhoe celebrates 20 years of medical news reporting reaching nearly 80 million TV households each week. Click here to learn more...
Advances in health and medicine.
Marjorie Bekaert Thomas
Publisher/President
Advances in health and medicine.
Advertisement
Seniors' Health Channel
Reported January 31, 2011

Dealing With Death: Mistakes We All Make

PASADENA, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) --In medicine, there’s one ultimate enemy. It’s what doctors try their hardest to avoid and what patients will fight until they have no options left. But death is an inescapable part of life, and we’ll all have to deal with it at some point. Do you know what to say or do if your loved one gets a terminal diagnosis? We’ll tell you about some common mistakes people make.  

Robert Gorelick traveled the world with his wife Sarah. But when Sarah was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer – Robert’s world turned upside down.

“There was never five minutes where she could forget she was ill,” Gorelick said.
How loved ones like Robert react can make all the difference for someone who is dying. One mistake: not using the right language. Experts say we shouldn’t talk about “winning” or “surviving” because when it’s time to face death, it feels like “losing” or “failing” to the patient.

“Could we possible see it as, you completed your life?” David Kessler, a grief and dying expert told Ivanhoe.  

Another mistake: not using hospice or palliative care. One study of more than 4,000 patients found hospice care extended survival for those with pancreatic cancer by three weeks, lung cancer by six weeks and heart failure by three months.

“You have someone here if they are in pain. It’s taken care of,” Gloria Herle, a woman whose father has terminal lung cancer told Ivanhoe.

Mistake number three: suggesting aggressive treatment when it won’t make the patient better. A recent study says two-thirds of patients will undergo therapies they don’t want if it’s what their loved ones want.

“The first thing you have to ask yourself is what would my loved one have wanted?” Kessler said.

The last mistake is not asking for a physical reminder of your loved one – such as letters, a written story or a recorded message.

“We even did a handprint of the mom for this young girl that she can always touch and just have that connection that children crave so badly,” Cindy Cisneros told Ivanhoe.

Robert holds onto lots of pictures of the wife he lost. Sweet memories during the most difficult time of his life.

Want another tip? You may want to rethink what your doctor tells you about your loved one. One study found 40 percent of oncologists report offering treatments that they believe are unlikely to work. And 63 percent of doctors in a Harvard study overestimated the survival time of their patients. The average estimate was 530 percent too high!

For additional research on this article, click here.

Sign up for a free weekly e-mail on Medical Breakthroughs called First to Know by clicking here.

If this story or any other Ivanhoe story has impacted your life or prompted you or someone you know to seek or change treatments, please let us know by contacting Marsha Hitchcock at mhitchcock@ivanhoe.com.


For More Information, Contact:

David Kessler
Co-Author “ On Grief and Grieving”
(818)762-7901 David@grief.com

Related Articles in Latest Medical News:

 
 
 Doctor Contact
 
 
 
  Subscribe
Medical Alerts!
 

[ Back to Seniors' Health Channel Home ]

EDITOR'S CHOICE
Most Recent Videos

Follow Us On:

Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Twitter page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Facebook page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's YouTube page
Advertisement

Home | What's New | News Flash | Search/Latest Medical News | E-Mail Medical Alerts!
Ivanhoe FAQ | Privacy Policy | Our TV Partners | Awards | Useful Links | Play It Again, Please
RSS Feeds | Advertising/Sponsorships | Content Syndication | Reprints

Advances in health and medicine.
webdoctor@ivanhoe.com
Copyright © 2014 Ivanhoe Broadcast News, Inc.
2745 West Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(407) 740-0789

P.O. Box 865
Orlando, Florida 32802

Premium Content in Latest Medical News Denotes Premium Content in Latest Medical News