Medical Breakthroughs Reported by Ivanhoe.com. Click here to go to the homepage.
Be the First to Know. Click here to subscribe FREE!
Search Reports: Use quotation marks around your multi-word search terms in the box below to perform search of Ivanhoe.com.
Advances in health and medicine.Use " marks around search terms
 
What's New
News Flash
Discussion
healthchannelnews
  Alternative Health
Arthritis
Asthma & Allergies
Autism
Breast Cancer
Cancer
Cardiovascular Health
Children's Health
Dental Health
Diabetes
Fertility & Pregnancy
Men's Health
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Nutrition & Wellness
Orthopedics
Pet Health
Robotics
Seniors' Health
Sports Medicine
Vision
Women's Health
Advances in health and medicine.
Click here to sign up for Medical Alerts!
Click below to access other news from Ivanhoe Broadcast News.
  Click here to get Ivanhoe's Medical Headline RSS feed Click here to listen to Ivanhoe's Medical Podcasts
Useful Links
Play It Again, Please
E-Mail a Friend
Order Books Online
Inside Science
Smart Woman
Advances in health and medicine.
Smart Woman Home
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Smart Woman Home
Advances in health and medicine.
Click below to learn about Ivanhoe.
  Awards
About Us
Contact Us
Employment
Feedback
Ivanhoe FAQ
Our TV Partners
Travel Calendar
Advances in health and medicine.
Ivanhoe celebrates 20 years of medical news reporting reaching nearly 80 million TV households each week. Click here to learn more...
Advances in health and medicine.
Marjorie Bekaert Thomas
Publisher/President
Advances in health and medicine.
Advertisement
General Health Channel
Reported October 5, 2011

Hormone Fights Fat With Fat

(Ivanhoe Newswire) – The fat we usually think of is called white fat, but there’s another type- brown fat- that burns fat. It was previously thought that brown fat disappeared after infancy, but recent advances in imaging technology led to its rediscovery in adults. Brown fat is full of blood vessels and mitochondria, making it very good at converting calories into energy, a process that malfunctions in obesity. Researchers found that orexin, a hormone produced in the brain, activates the brown fat in mice.
 
Orexin deficiency is associated with obesity, suggesting that orexin supplementation could provide a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity and other metabolic disorders. Most current weight loss drugs are aimed at reducing a person's appetite. An orexin-based therapy would represent a new class of fat-fighting drugs—one that focuses on peripheral fat-burning tissue rather than the brain's appetite control center.

"Our study provides a possible reason why some people are overweight or obese despite the fact that they don't overeat—they might lack the orexin necessary to activate brown fat and increase energy expenditure," Devanjan Sikder, D.V.M, Ph.D., senior author of the study and assistant professor in Sanford-Burnham's Diabetes and Obesity Research Center, located in Orlando's Medical City at Lake Nona, was quoted as saying.

Since the best way to determine something's function is to see what happens when it's missing, Dr. Sikder's team, which included postdoctoral researchers Dyan Sellayah, Ph.D. and Preeti Bharaj, Ph.D., looked at mice genetically engineered to lack orexin. These mice weighed more than their normal counterparts, but they actually ate less, suggesting that overconsumption was not the cause of their obesity. Rather, the orexin-deficient mice lacked diet-induced thermogenesis (heat production); in other words, when fed a high-fat diet, the mice failed to dissipate the extra calories as heat the way that normal mice (and people) do. Instead, they stored that energy as fat.

This finding prompted the team to look at the mice's brown fat—a source of thermogenesis. What they found is that brown fat in mice lacking orexin didn't develop properly at the embryonic stage. This shortage had lasting effects on energy expenditure and weight even in adulthood.

Taking the opposite approach, the researchers then gave the defective mice more orexin. With the hormone present, brown fat developed properly before birth and continued to be active into adulthood. What's more, adding orexin to stem cells in a laboratory dish caused them to differentiate (specialize) into brown fat cells, creating more of this fat-burning engine.

"Without orexin, mice are permanently programmed to be obese. With it, brown fat is activated and they burn more calories," said Dr. Sikder. "We're now taking the next steps in determining how orexin—or a chemical that has the same effect—might be used in humans to therapeutically prevent or treat obesity."

SOURCE: Cell Metabolism, published online October 5, 2011

 

 

Related Articles in Latest Medical News:

[ Back to General Health Channel Home ]

MEDICAL ALERT!
Stay up to date on General Health. We can notify you every time there is a medical breakthrough. Click here to sign up.
EDITOR'S CHOICE
Most Recent Videos
Your Baby DVD
What Every Pregnant Woman Should Know

Happier Woman DVD
25 ways to reduce stress

Forever Young DVD
25 ways to lose 10 years

Feel Good Again DVD
25 ways to STOP THE PAIN

If a treatment you read about here helps you, let us know...Click here!!

Follow Us On:

Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Twitter page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Facebook page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's YouTube page

Scale
Do you know if you are height-weight proportional?

Find out your Body Mass Index (BMI).

Click Here

Advertisement

How safe are your dietary supplements?

Click here to find out with the FDA's list of supplements and drug interactions.

Home | What's New | News Flash | Search/Latest Medical News | E-Mail Medical Alerts!
Ivanhoe FAQ | Privacy Policy | Our TV Partners | Awards | Useful Links | Play It Again, Please
RSS Feeds | Advertising/Sponsorships | Content Syndication | Reprints

Advances in health and medicine.
webdoctor@ivanhoe.com
Copyright © 2014 Ivanhoe Broadcast News, Inc.
2745 West Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(407) 740-0789

P.O. Box 865
Orlando, Florida 32802

Premium Content in Latest Medical News Denotes Premium Content in Latest Medical News