Medical Breakthroughs Reported by Ivanhoe.com. Click here to go to the homepage.
Be the First to Know. Click here to subscribe FREE!
Search Reports: Use quotation marks around your multi-word search terms in the box below to perform search of Ivanhoe.com.
Advances in health and medicine.Use " marks around search terms
 
What's New
News Flash
Discussion
healthchannelnews
  Alternative Health
Arthritis
Asthma & Allergies
Autism
Breast Cancer
Cancer
Cardiovascular Health
Children's Health
Dental Health
Diabetes
Fertility & Pregnancy
Men's Health
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Nutrition & Wellness
Orthopedics
Pet Health
Robotics
Seniors' Health
Sports Medicine
Vision
Women's Health
Advances in health and medicine.
Click here to sign up for Medical Alerts!
Click below to access other news from Ivanhoe Broadcast News.
  Click here to get Ivanhoe's Medical Headline RSS feed Click here to listen to Ivanhoe's Medical Podcasts
Useful Links
Play It Again, Please
E-Mail a Friend
Order Books Online
Inside Science
Smart Woman
Advances in health and medicine.
Smart Woman Home
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Smart Woman Home
Advances in health and medicine.
Click below to learn about Ivanhoe.
  Awards
About Us
Contact Us
Employment
Feedback
Ivanhoe FAQ
Our TV Partners
Travel Calendar
Advances in health and medicine.
Ivanhoe celebrates 20 years of medical news reporting reaching nearly 80 million TV households each week. Click here to learn more...
Advances in health and medicine.
Marjorie Bekaert Thomas
Publisher/President
Advances in health and medicine.
Advertisement
General Health Channel
Reported February 25, 2010

Lyme Disease: The Next Pandemic?

TAMPA, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It can leave victims more disabled than a heart attack. Some doctors say there is an under-recognized rise in the cases of Lyme disease in the U.S. If caught early, the disease is treatable, but in many cases, patients don't get the characteristic rash at the site of a bite. Now patients and doctors are speaking up about a disease that some are calling the next pandemic.

Ten years ago, Julie Hutchingson came down with a mysterious set of symptoms.

"Depression, severe fatigue, insomnia, series of vertigo, unexplained tendonitis that would not heal, floaters in my eyes," Julie Hutchingson told Ivanhoe.

The busy mom went from doctor to doctor, who suggested it could be over 10 different conditions.

"A couple of doctors mentioned HIV, possibly AIDS," Hutchingson recalled.

After seven years, she finally got a definitive diagnosis -- Lyme disease. The CDC reports about 20,000 cases of Lyme disease have occurred in the United States in recent years but says actual numbers could be up to 10-times that amount.

What is the root of the underreporting? Some doctors say it lies in the blood test.

"The CDC recognizes three strains right now," Michael Cichon, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, said. "But there might be 300 strains,"

Doctors also disagree on treatment. Doctor Cichon uses IV antibiotic therapy for four months or longer on some of his patients. The infectious diseases society of America says the long-term treatment carries risks like antibiotic resistance and infection and recommends a shorter course of less than two months -- based on three NIH studies.

"And all three studies indicated that prolonging antibiotic treatment after 60 days does not seem to have any further effect," David Balkwill, Ph.D., professor of microbiology at
UCF College of Medicine, Orlando, FL, said.

"The Infectious Diseases Society needs to stop their guidelines," Dr. Cichon added. "Make them just recommendations."

 One thing most agree on…

"Change needs to happen," Hutchingson exclaimed.

Julie underwent long-term antibiotic therapy. She hopes to save others from the unanswered questions that troubled her for years.

To better understand how Lyme disease spreads, the national science foundation recently awarded a four-year, 2.5 million dollar grant to scientists at five United States universities.

Besides a rash at the site of a tick bite, symptoms to watch out for include joint pain that migrates from one joint to another, fever, chills, fatigue and body aches.

For additional research on this article, click here.

Sign up for a free weekly e-mail on Medical Breakthroughs called First to Know by clicking here.

If this story or any other Ivanhoe story has impacted your life or prompted you or someone you know to seek or change treatments, please let us know by contacting Melissa Medalie at mmedalie@ivanhoe.com.

 

 FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

David Balkwill, PhD
University of Central Florida College of Medicine
Orlando, FL
balkwill@mail.ucf.edu

 

Susan Ganio
Nurse to Dr. Michael Cichon
Tampa, FL
(813) 985-5513

 

Open Eye Pictures, Inc.

http://www.underourskin.com

 

 

Related Articles in Latest Medical News:

 
 
 Doctor Contact
 
 
 
  Subscribe
Medical Alerts!
 

[ Back to General Health Channel Home ]

EDITOR'S CHOICE
Your Baby DVD
What Every Pregnant Woman Should Know

Happier Woman DVD
25 ways to reduce stress

Forever Young DVD
25 ways to lose 10 years

Feel Good Again DVD
25 ways to STOP THE PAIN

If a treatment you read about here helps you, let us know...Click here!!
Advertisement

Follow Us On:

Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Twitter page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Facebook page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's YouTube page

Scale
Do you know if you are height-weight proportional?

Find out your Body Mass Index (BMI).

Click Here

How safe are your dietary supplements?

Click here to find out with the FDA's list of supplements and drug interactions.

Home | What's New | News Flash | Search/Latest Medical News | E-Mail Medical Alerts!
Ivanhoe FAQ | Privacy Policy | Our TV Partners | Awards | Useful Links | Play It Again, Please
RSS Feeds | Advertising/Sponsorships | Content Syndication | Reprints

Advances in health and medicine.
webdoctor@ivanhoe.com
Copyright © 2014 Ivanhoe Broadcast News, Inc.
2745 West Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(407) 740-0789

P.O. Box 865
Orlando, Florida 32802

Premium Content in Latest Medical News Denotes Premium Content in Latest Medical News